We speak with each other, somehow

First I ought to say I hope that nobody who might be picking up on this will be trying to take the issue in a simplisitc way. It is in no regards.

I’ve discussed the theme of ANIMAL LANGUAGES before in an essay I wrote a couple of years ago, and I am coming back to this topic in form of a additional project that I want to start on this site:

A Human + Nonhuman mutual translation project.

This is gonna be difficult, because I don’t want to imposed neither any potentially restricitve definitions on my nonhuman fellows that I am working with, nor do I want to cater to the chorus of voices who seek to belittle Nonhumans on the basis of their cultures and languages being different and for us not translatable.

But right here I must pause, because: why can’t we translate Nonhuman Animals?

As I previoulsy suggested, as anti-speciesist I don’t see a difference when it comes to trying to unserstand “my opposite” – I think we can try to understand each other possibly, if we come to see our own language (and parameters) as relative.

I come from a non- or der anti-biologistic and anti-humancentric approach, and I only want to turn my views into public input, because it is horrifically ridiculous and more than that tragic, that we narrow down the idea of language to a contemporary and highly restricted definition of the term.

Animals …

We speak. We all have different approaches of how we try to understand each other, but to draw a line based on biology is problematic, as long as we fail to question that parameter of explanation.

I suggest to get away from any speciesist paradigm (see fragment of forms of speciesism) and use plain and naked reason to find solitions to accepting communication as a fact in itself (without further reproach to explicability within a humancentric dominant context) and I believe a broadened classification of ‘language” in terms of our own human language even is needed, and which can’t aswell be narrowed down to a set of neurological and technical terms.

 

Kritisches Weißsein, Rassismus und Veganismus

Kritisches Weißsein / kritische Weißseinstudien / kritische Weißseinsforschung und Rassismus sind immernoch unbearbeites Gebiet im akademischen und aktivistischen Bereich in der Tierbefreungsbewegung / Tierrechtsbewegung im deutschsprachigen Raum. Wir haben zum Thema einige Texte und Autor_innen vorgestellt. Hier soll nochmal darauf hingewiesen werden, und wir möchen den Lesern zum Themengebiet “vegane Intersektionalität unter dem Gesichtspunkt kritischer Weißseinsforschung” empfehlen:

Dr. A. Breeze Harper: Die Sistah Vegan Anthologie.Eine Buchvorstellung Vortrag: Vegane Nahrungsmittelpolitik: eine schwarze feministische Perspektive

Anastasia Yarbrough: Weißes Überlegenheitsdenken und das Patriarchat schaden Tieren.

 

Animal Thealogy: Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (Part 2)


Io – Farangis G Yegane

Animal Thealogy:

Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (2)

(And this was part one of that text.)

Palang LY

A geometrical image

Imagine two abstract groups. Group A consists of triangles and everything that surrounds them becomes mathematically relevant to their own triangular form. This happens as all that either resembles or does not resemble a triangle appears in a certain colour.

Group B are circles.

Now group A says that group B aren’t triangles (because A are triangles) and that B also weren’t squares or rectangles.

Does any reason follow from this that would mathematically legitimate for the circles to be excluded as equally valid geometrical figures?

The triangles are different compared to the circles, but both are geometrical figures and insofar of an equal value.

They can be correlated due to each of their geometrical qualities, even when the circles do not match the characteristics of the triangles!

Let’s take this as our metaphor

Sociology does not question the social interaction between humans and nonhuman animals. They don’t scrutinize that relation from their viewpoint, because the view held on the human relation towards animals is already set in its core by the natural sciences.

The hierarchical empire built by the natural sciences though [and along with it the humanistic knowledge on which the natural sciences base upon] rules every need for any further examination and consideration of this relationship out. We do not see the direct relation between humans and nonhuman animals.

A most typical exemplification of that inability to relate on a basic and fundamental level of ‘common sense’ can be pinpointed in the difference between relating to nonhuman animals in terms of “joy” versus “love”: as in “animals equally feel joy” or “we can both love”, and “pain” versus “violence”: as in: “animals can equally feel pain” or “we can both experience violence”. Love is a intermittent sentiment, violence also basis on social interactivity (though in that negative sense), where as “joy” is located only in the subject we attribute the feeling to, and the same goes for “pain”.

We – nonhuman animals and humans – understand the questions of LOVE and VIOLENCE. Whereby “joy” and “pain” are reductionary names for the “same” thing.

Regarding the question whether animals can be regarded in any way as moral agents, one has to ask, does moral exist outside the human concept of morality?

When we discuss morality we presume that the substance matter which the term comprises came into life through our perceptions, and because we define what „moral“ means, we can claim a described phenomenon as solely ours.

What does morality consist of?

Does morality solely exist because of a theoretical framework? One can doubt that. Morality on the one side has something to do with basic social interaction, through that morality gains value.

On the other side are the superordinate agreements about morality, which are declared and decided upon by an elite or defining group/process, but through that the agreements about morality only contain a forced validity, which is disconnected from its own basis, that is: the meaning of social interaction between beings (i.e. the construct about morality excludes that what lays outside of its hierarchy, other forms of interaction that contain „social values“ ).

On the individual plane exists that what any “I” perceives and experiences in her lived interactions and experiences as „morally okay“. And that can be between nonhuman animals or humans in the whole environmental context – seen from a common sense point of view if we take the human view.

When we discard the human decorum that surrounds and sticks to the word morality, we can say that every action has a moral implication, non-anthropocentrically seen.

It’s always the same: otherness. We have to accept it.

Animals have a very different philosophy-of-living in a neutral comparison to our philosophy of life, and I believe one can use the term philosophy here to describe the yet unnamed phenomenon in nonhumans animals of how they structure and perceive their own lives.

I ask myself whether the human problem with nonhuman animals isn’t rather to be found in the differences of their philosophies-of-life when compared to our typically human ones.

The problems lie much more in this radical otherness from us, than in the reasons of gradual biological differences or in the often assumed moral impotence on this other one’s (the animal’s) behalf.

The problem thus seems to fluctuate around the scope of difference and coinciding similarity. In many aspects we equal nonhumans animals a lot, but in the aspect of our dominance claim finally, we see nonhuman animals as „the losers“, the bottom of the evolutionary or divinely ordained hierarchical order on which we can postulate our violent and hypocritical sense of power.

That nonhuman animals are the losers amongst the biological animals is even an attitude that some of their advocates purport. I often meet people who won’t reckon a unique, self-sufficient quality seen to be in the closeness and distance amongst the different animals (including human animals). In the forefront of every argumentation there is always: how are they in comparison to us. As if humans and nonhuman animals had to compete on an „equal” scale … and another related argumentation goes: how much of their „instinct“ could possibly entitle them to be granted rights; right that would protect them from humans (whereby it is highly questionable whether those who have prejudices against you, can really grant you your own rights.)

Human society, it seems, will always consider the „us“ and the „we“ as objectively more important, insofar as the „we“, the how „we are“, is the criterion, and nonhumans animals are measured against it.

The crucial point is to accept others and to accept the validity of otherness. For the others and maybe even for us!

Reaching far? Animal Thealogy – female animal deities, female human deities, on the terms of such angles.

 

Vegan Bands: We asked Painted Wolves drummer Mattias about his thoughts on the contexts of ethical veganism

We asked Mattias of the Swedish vegan hardcore metal punk band PAINTED WOLVES (bandcampfacebook) if he could word for us what ethical veganism implies to him, also in regards to an all-encompassing intersectionality:

“‘If I can do some good I want to do it. If I have a choice I want to make it. It’s my human responsibility.’

Brilliant words by a brilliant band, one of my favorites ever: EMBRACE.

If we have the possibility to minimize suffering and damage in this world then why should we not try? If we have a choice then why should we not make it?

We’d all grow and evolve in a world without barriers. Until the last lock breaks none of us are free.”

Our favourite track on Painted Wolves album S/T is ‘Serve the Serpent’

Mattias is also with Anchor, Blessings and Nerve.

A link to the song cited.

PAINTED WOLVES latest (12″ 6-track) album: S/T has been released in June 2013. And yes, it’s vinyl: paintedwolves.bigcartel.com!

Veganismus und Intersektionalität


Warum intersektional ethisch vegan?

Palang LY

Dieser Text als PDF (Link öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

Intersektionalität ist dem Veganismus eigentlich inhärent. Der Veganismus berührt unterschiedliche ethische Felder, wobei am zentralsten die Gebiete unmittelbar um das Mensch-Tier-Verhältnis sind. An tierethische Fragen binden sich dann weiter die ökologischen Themen und diejenigen Fragen, die all das, was ‚Menschen ausschließlich’ anbetrifft, mit einbeschließen.

Ökologie und Gesundheit, die beiden Säulen des Veganismus, sind selbstverständlich genauso politische Themen. Im Zusammenhang mit dem Veganismus ergeben sich also Tangenten, die wir als die Intersektionen zweier perspektivischer Herkunftsorte (der Veganismus und soziale/politische Positionen) bezeichnen können.

Zur Zeit existieren einige vegane Projekte, die sich besonders solchen Schnittstellen zuwenden. Wichtige Themen sind dabei die Nahrungsmittelgerechtigkeit, Rassismus, Feminismus, Sexismus, Homophobie, Ableismus (die Diskriminierung behinderter Menschen), usw. Alle diese Themen werden in solchen Projekten mit dem Veganismus und aus veganer Sicht kontextualisiert.

Organisationen, Gruppen und Initiativen wie beispielweise das Food Empowerment Project, Sistahvegan, Vegans of Color, vegan-feministische Gruppen und Blogs, oder ein neueres Buchprojekt, das sich dem Thema ‘Behinderung und ethischer Veganismus’ zuwendet (The Disabled Vegan Reader), sind vegane Projekte dieser Art; hier finden wir erweiterte Perspektivmöglichkeiten der veganen Ethik auf verschiedene Weise durch verschiedene Schwerpunkte adressiert.

Vermieden werden soll durch die Kontextualisierung (und da sind sich alle einig), dass der Veganismus die Chance verpassen könnte sein politisches Potential dazu zu nutzen, erweiterte Ansätze zu schaffen, durch die nichtmenschliche Tiere und die natürliche Umwelt verstärkt mit in den Mittelpunkt der ethischen Hauptbelange gesetzt werden können. In allen uns bekannten intersektionalen veganen Projekten spiegelt sich der Gedanke wieder, dass  ethischer Veganismus und Demokratie komplentäre Spieler sind und hier müssen noch zahlreiche neue Wege beschritten und Möglichkeiten erschlossen werden.

Intersektionalität wirkt manchmal wie ein Umweg, um die spezifisch tierrechtsbezogenen Fragen herum und nicht direkt auf sie zugehend. Das Gleichgewicht beizubehalten ist in Diskussionen wichtig, besonders wenn alle Themen zeitgleich und dringlich in ihren Zusammenhängen behandelt werden müssen. Die Schwierigkeit liegt oft darin, dass sich zwar eine Richtung abzeichnet, in der sich das gemeinsame Übel befindet: Ursachen von Unterdrückung, Diskriminierung, Gewalt, Zerstörung – aber es gibt keine Allzwecklösungen für diese Unzahl komplexer Probleme, denen sich also auch ein pluralistischer veganer Aktivismus gegenübergestellt sieht.

Eines ist natürlich klar: wenn eine Aktivitstin hauptsächlich oder auch ausschließlich über ihr Gebiet spricht, seien es Tierrechts-, Menschenrechts- oder Umweltschutzbelange, heißt das nicht immer zwingenderweise, dass das Gesagte auch massiv weiter führt: Vieles an Output, den wir von anderen Aktivist_Innen erhalten, sind Dinge, die wir schon oft gehört haben, Dinge die leider nicht wieder neu auf ihre aktuelle Gültigkeiten hin überprüft werden oder upgedated werden um sich an neuere Erkenntnisse im Bereich Aktivismus zu orientieren.

Auch stellt die Methodik, wie von Fragen, die sich in intersektionalen Themenbereichen (z.B. Feminismus und Antirassismus) bewegen, hingeführt werden kann zur Tierethik und zum Umweltschutz, immer wieder eine starke Herausforderung und wichtige Aufgabe dar (der man sicherlich mit einiger kritischer Selbstreflektion gerecht werden könnte).

Wie weit sind wir bereit dazu, die Rahmen so zu stecken, die sich nicht allein auf die begangenen einseitigen Wege beziehen?

Gemeint ist: Dort wo Sexismus oder Rassismus stattfindet, sehen wir unter Bezugnahme auf Tierrechte und Ökologie, dass Gründe/Hintergründe von sowohl Unterdrückung als auch Zerstörung ja tatsächlich noch weiter zu fassen sind, als wir das bislang mit unseren Erklärungsmodellen getan haben. Rahmen müssen neu gesteckt werden und solche intersektionalen Projekte helfen dabei immens.

Wir wollen uns im Rahmen unseres veganen Selbsverständisses nach neuen, interessanten Antworten umschauen, wie der Veganismus sich von seinen Verfechtern her als ein junges demokratisches Element einer (soweit noch) Minderheitsbewegung mit einbringt: Wie werden Menschenrechte, Umweltfragen und selbstverständlich vor allen Dingen Tierfragen heute aus ihrer Box derer Konzepte rausgeholt, die ein neues Denken bislang noch zu hindern scheinen?

Zusammenhänge aufzuzeigen führt zu umfassenderen Fragen / Antworten.

Links

Food Empowerment Project: http://www.foodispower.org/
The Disabled Vegan Reader: http://www.disabledveganreader.com/
The Sistah Vegan Project: http://sistahvegan.com/
Vegans of Color: http://vegansofcolor.wordpress.com/

The problems we cause for animals and for each other, and the fine distinction

Late night rambling, please excuse the roughness

Two things

A.) Elitism in the vegan movement

B.) Eliminating animal death is one thing, but as far as our inner conflicts as a human society are concerned (capitalism, socialism questions) we should first think about our GREED (as a trait and character deformity that counts as normal today) before we put the discardment of animal products alongside on the shelf with some of the symptoms of intra-human social injustice.

The ‘new animal’ first!

Can we rightly say it’s the same to exclude animal products for ethical reasons and addressing our inner human political and social crisis? What causes a intra-human political and social crisis? In the end of the day it’s each of us and how we shape daily life in every possible step, and also how we seek to shape our careers, that directly impacts the social and political dilemmas.

EVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION is the disastrous link between the misery we impose upon nonhuman animals and our societal and individual self-definitions as the human group.

There is morally no way round to primarily address animal issues alongside an aim of a new ‘enlightenment’ that progresses but also alters term of ‘human’ (animal!) freedom. Since animals are our co-beings that we draw into the total catastrophe without any ethical legitimization whatsoever, animal rights will redefine much of our cultural self understanding/s.

We have to stop leading our personal lives and our collective goals so, that we keep on with the exploitation and the destruction of the free natural space that is originally and rightly the animal habitat! Separating the notion of an intact animal habitat (nature) from our rights-self-definition would throw us back into a heavily anthropocentrist thinking.

We should really rethink how we as humans act, on every scale! What we likely consider to be NORMAL, is likely in reality homocentrist/anthropocentrist selfishness and destructivity. When we step out of this “NORMALITY” and lead an UNNORMAL way of life, we don’t even accept that we might be doing the only thing that will open our sight, since we got so used to the narrowmindedness of ‘being human’ and not our (very individual and perhaps in this world lonely) selves. We need to have courage – again, and again and again. Against all “odds”!

And I have to note: Elitism in the vegan and animal advocacy movement … In one sentence, I don’t think elitism helps on the long run with a liberation movement.

Jost Hermand zu Richard Wagner und dem Vegetarismus als Motiv in seiner letzten Oper Parsifal

 

Aus: Jost Hermand, Glanz und Elend: der deutschen Oper, 2008, S. 139.
Richard Wagner: Parsifal (1882), Die vegetarische Botschaft seiner letzten Bekenntnisoper, “Ich schreibe Misik mit einem Ausrufezeichen!” – Richard Wagner

Dieser Eintrag ist u.a. getagged mit VEGAN PEDAGOGY, warum?

Weil es Menschen ermutigt wenn sie von anderen Menschen hören, die vor sich, chronologisch gesehen bereits in einer Zeit vor ihnen, über ähnliche Themenkomplxe Gedanken gemacht haben … . Vor allem, wenn so ein Thema ein ethisch so wichtiges aber auch so schwierig zu behandelndes ist, wie das tierethischen Denkens.

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

Palang LY

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

There so far is no such thing as a “positive” veganic (which means: organic vegan agriculture) Animal Rights consciousness.

Not taking into consideration that nonhuman animals must be helped by all possible means, here looks to me like a form of speciesism might be lurking in the background, since if humans where in a comparable plight, anybody who would describe him-/herself as a non- misanthrope would help the humans in question.

What I am mainly interested in is:

Why doesn’t it occur to vegans and the veganic (vegan organic) movement, that humans and nonhuman animals can co-exist, can co-live without exploitation, as an option?

I have looked at various veganic projects, and as far as one can see, “animal rights” only plays a role in the way, that exploitation and usage of animals and animal products / fertilizer derived from animals is non-permitted, on ethical grounds, mainly. Hence, these people are VEGANS, and not just any people avoiding animal products: They avoid animal exploitation. That’s the Animal Rights part of the veganic movement.

But apart from that, the very nonhuman animals that we as VEGANS want to HELP, don’t come in or become visible or noticed as beings that we are willing to live together with, that we are willing to share the earth with. As if the soil and the forests were ours to use, ours to live on, ours to say what’s right to do with it (“it” … that is: nature).

Billions of animals

Of course the forceful exploitation of the reproductive system of animals has to stop. Of course any form of overpopulation is bad for anybody and this planet. But the lives, that didn’t chose to come into this world, the lives that just happen to find themselves here – we do have to ethically respect the fact that these individuals exist.

Sanctuaries and vegan farming should merge I believe! To cut a long “story” short and practical.

But back to veganic-ism as it is

There is the mention of using human manure and faeces for fertilization (apart from the much more promising sounding self-fertilizing gardening methods which exist in veganicism too of course). But if people are willing to use their own manure, as part of the biological process of vegan agriculture, can’t the idea of “the sanctuary” and the idea of a newly veganic option be created in peoples minds? People can tolerate their own manure somewhere, but not another (nonhuman) animal’s manure? I think we cannot say that it is speciesist and exploitative if both humans and nonhuman animals live together in a natural space without harming or exploiting or using each other.

We as vegans ought to LIVE together with the other animals on this planet, in a peaceful manner, in mixed communities. If we can’t develop a consciousness for that, we fail at creating a (more complete) positive ethic. It’s enormously tragic that we let the speciesist view of “animals, us and the world” win insofar, that this view manages to inspire us vegans not to willingly plan to live together with the so called farm animals in a vegan, caring manner, with a strong will to co-exist.

Are the only options we can chose from the one of degrading nonhuman animals or otherwise totally excluding them, and making them nonexistent in a (desired utopian) daily reality? No, really, because this planet is also an animals’ planet!

Ethics … To me the veganic movement makes itself look as if it creates and expresses a bifurcation in what veganism ideally should mean. As good at it looks now and as much as such farming practices are heading for the major part in a promising and important and ethically inevitable direction, the veganic code of ethics nevertheless ignores an important factor and that is, again, to include all animals in a life affirming way.

This fallacy in the veganic vegan understanding makes vegans overall look as if this movement was basically about clearing nonhuman animals in their positives – and as living facts and individual fates – simply out of our lives!

I think there is morally something going drastically wrong with us.

This text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Der vegane ökologische Fußabdruck. Teil 2

Gita Yegane Arani-Prenzel

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fußabdruck wenn Du vegan lebst?

Teil 2

Dieser Artikel als PDF

Eine vegane Lebens- und Ernährungsweise bringt viele ökologische Vorteile mit sich. Dennoch, wer vegan ist, sollte sich über die größeren Zusammenhänge, über Ursachen und Wirkungsweise von Umweltzerstörung und Speziesismus Gedanken machen und seinen Lebensstil auch gemäß seiner neu gewonnenen Erkenntnisse korrigieren. Ein weitreichendes, umfassendes Denken ist nötig, um geringere Schäden anzurichten als man es mit seiner gegenwärtigen Lebensweise vielleicht noch tut. Denn sogar die potenziell pazifistischste aller Lebensweisen, die vegane Lebensweise, kann immer noch optimiert werden!

Von der Schaffung einer veganen Ökologie

Die Fleischproduktion hat sich seit dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges vervierfacht. Das war in dem Zuge, in dem die volle Industrialisierung der „Nutztier“-haltung und die moderne Tier-Agrarindustrie entstanden. Heute wächst der Bedarf für tierische Produkte in den Großnationen wie China und Indien in einem unabsehbaren Maße; dort, wo die Mittelklasse einen „typisch westlichen“ Lebensstil noch für etwas Nachahmenswertes hält. Auf der anderen Seite sehen wir Nahrungsmittelknappheit, Mangelernährung und Hunger in großen Teilen der Welt. Wir sind konfrontiert mit der globalen Erwärmung, dem Klimawandel, der Verschmutzung der Umwelt durch Abfälle und Gifte. Die Zerstörung ökologisch hoch komplexer Gleichgewichte, die wir Menschen durch beinahe alle Bereiche unseres täglichen Lebens verursachen, ist allgegenwärtig. Wir bezeugen die Rate der Entwaldung auf den Kontinenten, die wachsende Wasserknappheit und die Auslöschung von Spezies. Und all das geschieht hauptsächlich, weil Land zum Anbau von Futtermitteln gebraucht wird, um den unerschütterlichen Hunger der Menschen für Fleisch, Milch und Eier zu stillen, und um Industrien aufrecht zu erhalten, die sich von Tierprodukten als billiger und selbstverständlicher Ressource wirtschaftlich abhängig gemacht haben.

Es gibt keine ökologisch vernünftige und realisierbare Gleichung, die den Bedarf der großen Konsumnationen und derer marktwirtschaftlichen Mechanismen und andererseits notwendiges Menschenrecht weltweit miteinander vereinbar werden ließe. Die Menschheit vernichtet durch ihren Zwang zur Umweltzerstörung ihre eigene Lebensgrundlage durch Produktions- und Konsumprozesse. So befinden wir uns inmitten der größten kulturgeschichtlichen Aporie, der die Menschheit sich, in ihrem Exklusivheitsstatus, mit dem sie sich von der Natur abzugrenzen suchte, je selbst ausliefern konnte.

Wir als Veganer_innen sollten unsere Negativauswirkung auf die natürliche Umwelt, die nichtmenschlichen Tiere und die soziale Menschenwelt in allen Aspekten stetig zu reduzieren suchen und weiterhin abwägen, was für die Welt wirklich beiträglich ist und sein könnte. Wir sollten uns nicht unüberlegt treiben lassen durch das, was die Gesellschaft und das eigene Fortkommen gerade von uns zu verlangen scheinen. Veränderungen müssen auf allen Ebenen geschehen.

Das Autofahren auf das Nötigste zu reduzieren, Wasserverschwendung zu meiden, energieeffizienter die Abläufe im Haushalt und Draußen planen, Urlaub neu zu definieren und sich nicht einfach in den Flieger zu setzen, das sind alles Schritte die wir tun sollten. Was wir als „Standard“-Veganer aber auf jeden Fall schaffen – und das ist zweifellos der Punkt größter ethischer Relevanz – ist den grundsätzlichsten Beitrag zum Schutz unserer Umwelt zu leisten, durch unsere pflanzliche Ernährungsweise. Tier-, Menschen- und Erdrechte gehören zusammen und diese Zusammenhänge in unserem täglichen Leben und unseren täglichen Entscheidungen zu berücksichtigt sollte unser fortlaufendes Ziel sein.

Vegan zu leben wirkt dem Welthunger entgegen

Die FAO (die Food and Agriculture Organization der UN) erklärt in einem Bericht von 2005, dass mehr als fünf Millionen Kinder jedes Jahr an Hunger sterben. Man rechnet damit, dass sich die Zahl der Weltbevölkerung bis zum Jahr 2050 von 6 Milliarden auf 9 Milliarden Menschen erhöhen wird. Eine der zentralsten Fragen des 21. Jahrhunderts wird sein, wie die Menschheit sich in Zukunft ernähren will oder kann.

Die Verfügbarkeit anbaufähigen Landes ist eines der Haupthindernisse in der Nahrungsmittelerzeugung. Die Welt hat nur ein begrenztes Maß an Land, das zum Anbau eingesetzt werden kann. Es ist daher also entscheidend, wie solches Land bestellt wird um damit ausreichend Menschen versorgen zu können.

Die typische Ernährungsform des Westens, die primär auf tierischen Produkten basiert, spielt eine wesentliche Rolle dabei, dass Menschen in den ärmeren Regionen der Welt der Zugang zu ausreichend und gesunden Lebensmitteln verwährt ist. Die Funktionsweisen der Tieragrarindustrie und des Marktes sind komplex und schwer durchschaubar, aber die Zusammenhänge zwischen Welthunger, Mangelernährung und der Tierausbeutung durch die Agrarindustrien bestehen.

Feststeht, dass unterschiedliche Studien aufzeigen, dass die vegane Ernährungsweise (und die vegane Lebensweise insgesamt in ihrem Verzicht auf alle tierischen Produkte un Nebenerzeugnisse) nur ein Drittel der Anbaufläche bedarf, als das für die typische westliche tierprodukt-dependente Lebensweise nötig ist.

Fruchtbare Äcker und intaktes Land

Zu Gründen für die gefährliche Bodendegradation zählen die Überweidung zu 35%, die Entwaldung zu 30% und landwirtschaftliche Vorgehensweisen zu 27%. [1] Diese Schädigungsursachen sind direkt oder indirekt verbunden mit dem Verbrauch tierischer Produkte.

Das World Recources Institute (WRI, http://www.wri.org/) erklärt, dass fast 40% der Agrarlandfläche weltweit ernsthaft degrativ geschädigt sind. Das International Food Policy Research Insitute (IFPRO, http://www.ifpri.org/), das sich mit nachhaltiger Nahrungsversorgung und Welthunger befasst, geht davon aus, dass wenn Land und Anbaufläche weiter wie im gegenwärtigen Maße geschädigt werden, zusätzliche 150 bis 360 Millionen Hektar Land bis zum Jahr 2020 nicht mehr zum Anbau nutzbar sein werden. [2]

Der Zuwachs der Weltpopulation ist somit nicht der einzige Faktor, der in Betracht gezogen werden muss, wenn Prognosen für die zukünftige Nahrungsmittelsicherheit gestellt werden. Die Fläche fruchtbaren Landes, das zum Anbau von Ernten eingesetzt werden kann, verringert sich zunehmends, und die Weiterführung intensiver Produktion auf bereits geschädigtem Land stellt keine nachhaltige Lösung dar.

Der Teufelskreis der unvermeidlich entsteht, ist der, dass Menschen wegen weniger fruchtbarer Böden die Bestellflächen ausdehnen müssen. Die damit einhergehende Entwaldung verursacht eine weitere Verschlechterung der Böden. Ein circulus vitiosus und Gipfel unserer allein nutzungsorietierten landwirtschaftlichen Praktiken.

Eine vegane Ökonomie sollte idealerweise bedarfs- statt gewinnorientiert sein, und statt blindem Konsumentenverhalten, sollte eine Ausrichtung auf die natürlichen Notwendigkeiten und der Einklang mit der natürlichen Welt angestrebt werden. Die Natur, statt die durch den Konsum angeregten Lebensfiktionen, sollte zum Fokalpunkt im Realitätsbewusstsein der Menschen werden. Ein veganer Lebensstil und ein neues ethisches Denken, das den Veganismus als Idee umfasst, können dabei wirksam helfen, die weitere Zerstörung wertvollen fruchtbaren Landes und der Natur zu verhindern.

Keine kompromittierenden Kompromisse und kein Flexitarismus können helfen

Spätestens seit dem United Nations FAO Bericht von 2006 gilt speziell auch die Geflügelindustrie als besonders umweltgefährdend, nicht zuletzt weil sie ein noch stark anwachsender Zweig der tierausbeutenden Industrien darstellt. [3] [4]

Die Wahl der bevorzugten Tierspezies zum Verzehr und zur Ausbeutung und die pervertierte “artgerechte” Perfektionierung in den Voraussetzungen zur Haltung von nichtmenschlichen Tieren, spiegeln einen prinzipiellen fortlaufenden Versuch das alte Bild und stereotype Ideal vom Menschen als omnivor-carnivoren Prädatoren und Jäger und Sammler zu retten, statt sich über die gegenwärtigen ökologischen Notwendigkeiten tatsächlich Gedanken zu machen. Die Vernunft und das Bewusstsein, die es braucht um über die ethische „Miteinanderschaft“ von Mensch und Tier in der natürlichen Welt  nachzudenken, sind in unseren Kulturen noch immer weitestgehend unterentwickelt.

Wälder retten

Wir alle brauchen Wälder zum Leben, in jeder Hinsicht. Sie sind unsere Lungen, sie schlucken enorme Massen an Kohlendioxid und spenden dafür Sauerstoff, sie regulieren die Klimaverhältnisse, schützen vor Überflutungen, schützen kostbare Böden und beheimaten Millionen verschiedener Tierarten/Tierindividuen und beherbergen ihre unglaublich reichen und faszinierenden Pflanzenwelten und Welten anderen organischen Lebens. Auch das Fortbestehen Tausender indigener Völker hängt vom Schutz ihrer Heimatwälder ab. Aber der Wald wird rapide zerstört, ohne jegliche Möglichkeit das, was der Welt, den Tieren und den Menschen dadurch verloren geht, jemals wiederherzustellen.

Wie das, was wir auf unseren Tellern haben einen effektiven Unterschied macht, auch in Sachen globaler Entwaldung

Außer dass Abholzung geschieht wegen der Gewinnung von Holz, Papier und Brennstoffen, findet die Entwaldung auch statt um Weideland zu gewinnen und für den Futtermittelanbau für diejenigen Tiere, die permanent oder überwiegend in Agrareinrichtungen in Hallen oder anderen Einsperrungssystemen gehalten werden.

Schätzungen des World Recources Institute gehen davon aus, dass 20-30% der einstig bewaldeten Landfläche der Erde bereits der Agrarkultur weichen mussten und für Agrarzwecke abgeholzt wurden. Da das Agrarland aber zunehmend geschädigt ist, muss zur Ersetzung der depletierten Flächen wiederum eine weitere Entwaldung stattfinden.

Die Ausweitung von Agrarland ist für mehr als 60% der weltweiten Entwaldung verantwortlich. Das meiste dieses erschlossenen und genutzten Landes wird zur Fütterung von Rindern zu Agrarzwecken benutzt. Der UN FAO Bericht ‚Livestock’s Long Shadow’ hält fest, dass „bis zum Jahr 2010 Rinder auf etwa 24 Millionen Hektar neotropoischen Landes grasen werden, das im Jahr 2000 noch bewaldet war.“ [6] Dieser Prozess wird zynischer- und grausamerweise als die „Hamburgerisierung“ der Wälder bezeichnet – in den USA nennt man „Hackfleisch“ umgangssprachlich auch „Hamburger“.

Die vegane Lebensweise kann durch ihre Praxis und Ethik wesentlich dazu beitragen, die Ausbeutung des Reproduktivsystems nichtmenschlicher Tiere zu bekämpfen und damit einhergehend auch die Wälder der Welt zu schützen.

Die natürliche Integrität der nichtmenschlichen Tiere und der Natur müssen zusammen geschützt werden um zu einer vernünftigen Sinngebung unserer eigenen Existenz in der Welt zu gelangen.

Fortsetzung

Der vegane ökologische Fußabdruck. Teil 3. Tierrechte, der Schutz der Artenvielfalt und Schutzhöfe für unsere „domestizierten“ Tierfreunde

http://simorgh.de/vegan/wie_gross_ist_dein_oekologischer_fussabdruck_3.pdf

Quellen

[1] United Nations Environment Programme, GEO: Global Environment Outliook, Land degradation, http://www.unep.org/geo/geo3/english/141.htm letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[2] News & Views – A 2020 Vision for Food, Agriculture, and the Environment – March 1999: Are We Ready for a Meat Revolution? (IFPRI, 1999, 8 p.), How Large a Threat Is Soil Degradation? http://www.nzdl.org/gsdlmod?e=d-00000-00—off-0fnl2.2–00-0—-0-10-0—0—0direct-10—4——-0-1l–11-en-50—20-about—00-0-1-00-0–4—-0-0-11-10-0utfZz-8-00&cl=CL2.10.6&d=HASH0152336f21ea37b260b944e2.3&x=1 letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[3] Steinfeld H, Gerber P, Wassenaar T, Castel V, Rosales M, de Haan C. Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 2006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367646/ letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[4] P. Gerber, C. Opio and H. Steinfeld, Poultry production and the environment – a review, Animal Production and Health Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy, http://www.fao.org/AG/againfo/home/events/bangkok2007/docs/part2/2_2.pdf letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[5] Porter, G. and J. W. Brown, Table of Deforesation and its Effects, https://confluence.furman.edu:8443/display/Lipscomb/Deforestation+and+Effects+(MB) letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012. Siehe auch Global Environmental Politics. (Westview Press,Boulder,Colorado) 1991.

[6] UN FAO, Livestock’s long shadow, Chapter 5, Biodiversityftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/a0701e/a0701e05.pdf letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fußabdruck wenn Du vegan lebst?

Gita Yegane Arani-Prenzel

Der ökologische Fußabdruck einer veganen Ernährungsweise im Vergleich zur omnivoren / carnivoren Ernährung

Dieser Artikel als PDF

Eine Ernährungsumstellung auf die vegane Ernährungs- und Lebensweise ist, sowohl auf individueller als auch auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene, der folgenreichste Schritt zur Reduzierung  unseres ökologischen Fußabdrucks, der getan werden kann. Ein vierköpfiger Haushalt der eine Woche lang auf Fleisch, Eier und Milchprodukte verzichtet, macht sich dadurch um vergleichsweise soviel umweltverträglicher, als würde dieser Haushalt ein dreiviertel Jahr lang auf das Autofahren verzichten, so die amerikanische Umwelt-NGO ‚Environmental Working Group’ (http://www.ewg.org/).

Was wir essen?

Fleischesser bzw. Carnivore (oder auch Omnivore, die „alles“ essen) verzehren das Fleisch domestizierter und wildlebender Tiere, einschließlich „Geflügel“ (also Vögel) und „Fisch“ (also Fische).

Vegetarier essen alles außer Fleisch

Ovo-Vegetarier essen Eier, aber keine Milchprodukte, und Lakto-Vegetarier wiederum essen Milchprodukte, aber keine Eier. Ovo-Lakto-Vegetarier essen sowohl Eier als auch Milchprodukte.

Man könnte sagen, dass ein echter oder strikter Vegetarier einem Veganer ziemlich nah kommen müsste in seiner Ernährungsweise. Veganer_innen essen kein Fleisch, keine Eier, keine Milchprodukte, und, was aber hinzu kommt, auch keinen Honig! Darüberhinaus vermeiden sie allen Konsum, Gebrauch und Verzehr jeglicher tierischer Produkte und derer Derivate und Nebenerzeugnisse. Die Vegan Society in Großbritannien empfiehlt den Veganismus konsequent in allen Lebensbereichen durchzusetzen, soweit es für den einzelnen praktizierbar ist.

Was ich esse ist doch umweltverträglich, oder?

Das Global Footprint Network (http://www.footprintnetwork.org) eine Denkfabrik die sich mit der Nachhaltigkeitsforschung befasst, sagt, der ökologische Fußabdruck „bemisst das Maß, in dem wir Ressourcen konsumieren und Abfallstoffe produzieren, verglichen mit der Kapazität der Natur unsere Ausstöße zu verarbeiten und neue Ressourcen zu schaffen.“

Der Kreislauf von Lebensmittelkonsum und -herstellung ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil des ökologischen Fußabdrucks. Man bemisst ihn zumeist daran, wie viel Hektar biologisch-produktiver Anbaufläche und Meeresfläche benötigt wird, um den Nahrungsbedarf eines Individuums oder einer Gemeinschaft zu decken.

Und was macht da das Fleisch?

Im Jahr 2006 erklärte die Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) der Vereinten Nationen, dass die Nutztierhaltung inbesondere zur Fleischproduktion, verantwortlich zu machen sei für etwa ein Fünftel der Treibhausgase weltweit; man gab öffentlich auf hoher Ebene zu, dass die Nutztierhaltung massiv zur globalen Erwärmung beiträgt.

Eine neuere Untersuchung des Woldwatch Institute (http://www.worldwatch.org/), einer Umwelt-Denkfabrik aus Washington D.C., erfasst aber noch weitere versteckte Faktoren der „Nutztier“-haltung, die zu den Emissionen beitragen, und man kommt in deren Studie auf einundfünfzig Prozent aller Treibgase, für die die Nutztierhaltung weltweit verantwortlich zu machen ist. [1]

Die größeren Zusammenhänge

Ein Faktor, der auch in die empfindliche Waagschale des zerstörten ökologischen Gleichgewichts und dem nicht enden wollenden menschlichen Konsum mit hineingeworfen werden muss, ist die Frage nach der Wasserknappheit, insbesondere den Dürren und den auf sie folgenden Engpässen in der Sicherheit zur Verfügung stehender Nahrungsmittel. [2]

Eine Nahrungsmittelknappheit könnte die Welt zum Vegetarismus zwingen, titelt ein Artikel im ‚Guardian’ vom August 2012: [3]

„Die Annahme einer vegetarischen Ernährungsweise“ [konsequenterweise müsste es eine vegane Lebensweise heißen, da, wenn Tiere Milch, Eier und Leder produzieren sollen, sie dazu auch zur Körperausbeute gehalten werden müssen], so der Artikel im ‚Guardian’, „ist ein Weg, um in einer zuhnehmend klimagestörten Welt die Wassermengen zu erhalten, die nötig wären zum Anbau von mehr Nahrung,“ so die im Guardian zitierten Wissenschaflter, „[…] tierische proteinreiche Lebensmittel brauchen zu ihrer Erzeugung zehn Mal mehr Mengen an Wasser, als die vegetarische Nahrungsmittelerzeugung. Ein Drittel der kultivierbarsten Landfläche in der Welt wird zum Anbau von Ernten verwendet, die der Tierfütterung dienen. Zu den anderen Optionen, die dabei helfen können Menschen zu ernähren, gehört eine Reduzierung von [Lebensmittel-] Abfällen und eine Steigerung des Handels zwischen denjenigen Ländern, die Überschüsse an Nahrungsmitteln produzieren mit denjenigen Ländern, in denen Mangel herrscht.“

Der Viehzucht-Sektor bietet für zahllose Menschen in den ärmsten Regionen der Welt Nahrung und Einkünfte, so argumentieren manche Befürworter der Fleischindustrie. Das ‚Heifer Projekt’ beispielsweise, sieht seine Aufgabe in einer Art humanitärer Arbeit, die daraus besteht, Armen und Bedürftigen in Schwellen- und Entwicklungsländern „Nutztiere“ als argarwirtschafltiche Einkunftsquelle und Nahrungslieferanten auf Spendenbasis zu liefern. Auch gibt es Förderungsprogramme westlicher Nationen, wie die sogenannte ‘Livestock Revolution’, die ihre Fördermaßnahmen mit der Übernahme viehzüchterischer Techniken und Handhabungsweisen als Bedingungsvariablen verknüpfen.

Die speziesistische Behauptung, Menschen sei durch die Ausbeutung von Tieren geholfen, soll glauben machen machen, dass die argarwirtschaftliche Tierhaltung etwas den Menschen Gutes und Förderliches sei, und nicht zuletzt ist in den meisten Kulturen der Welt tatsächlich eine Trennung des Einsatzes nichtmenschlicher Tiere als Lebensressourcen von menschlicher Identität, Kultur und Gesellschaft noch immer kaum denkbar.

Der Mythos rund um die Nostalgie des Kleinbauern erscheint aber zunehmend als umstrittener. Offenkundig wird das erkennbar bei der Kritik an den westlichen Biobauern, bei denen ihr Fauxpax in der Langzeitutopie sichtbar wird: man könne den Fleischkonsum in Maßen retten, im Zeitalter des Massenkonsums. Daneben existiert in der Bioindustrie auch noch das weitaus größere Problem der Missstände in der Tierhaltung, die sich in den großen Agrareinrichtungen und den kleinen Bauernhöfen kaum unterscheiden. Tiere sind eben fühlende, freiheitsbegabte und tierlich-denkende Lebewesen, und keine Form der Ausbeutung und Tiertötung zu gleich welchen menschlichen Zwecken können da eine Ausnahme bilden.

Was die Nutztierhaltung in den Entwicklungsgebieten der Welt anbetrifft, so muss man sich darüber im Klaren sein, dass Kleinbauern auch Teil des Systems der Ausbeutung tierlicher Körper sind. Kleinbauern sind durch Großbetriebe ersetzbar um einen zunehmenden und stimulierten Bedarf an tierischen Produkten zu decken, der sich aus komplexen kulturellen und wirtschaftlichen Faktoren zwangsläufig heraus entwickelt. Sowohl bewaldetes und „wildes“ Land, so auch die Böden, die als freie Anbauflächen bestellt werden können, verschwinden in Zuge eines argarwitschaftlichen „Erwachens“ und werden einer industriellen Nutzbarkeit unterworfen.

Mehr als 80 Prozent des Wachstums im Viehzucht-Sektor kommt heute von den industriellen Produktionssystemen. Die Viehzucht ist ein Faktor, der knappes Land, sauberes Wasser und andere natürliche Ressourcen für die ärmsten der Menschen schluckt und der freien Lebensraum für Tiere zerstört. Die Abhängigkeit von einem zunehmend industrialisierten Lebensstandard, auch wenn solch ein Standard sich auf einem Minimum bewegen mag, ist kaum wieder aufzulösen. Auch ist die Vorstellung vom Fleischkonsum als einem Ausdruck von sozialem Prestige, ein Glaube, dem Menschen immer noch allzu leicht verfallen.

Fortsetzung

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fussabdruck, wenn Du vegab lebst? Teil 2: Von der Schaffung einer veganen Ökologie

http://simorgh.de/vegan/wie_gross_ist_dein_oekologischer_fussabdruck_2.pdf

Quellen

[1] Robert Goodland, Jeff Anhang: Livestock and Climate Change, World Watch November/December 2009, http://www.worldwatch.org/files/pdf/Livestock%20and%20Climate%20Change.pdf  (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).

[2] A. Jägerskog, T. Jønch Clausen (eds.): Feeding a thirsty world: Challenges and opportunities for a water and food secure world, Stockhold International Water Institute, 2012, http://www.siwi.org/sa/node.asp?node=52&sa_content_url=%2Fplugins%2FResources%2Fresource.asp&id=318 (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).

[3] John Vidal: Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists, The Guardian, 26. Aug. 2012, http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/aug/26/food-shortages-world-vegetarianism (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).