A not so clear relation: Animal Agency and Morality

Animal Agency and Morality

IS “MORAL AGENCY” A VALID CRITERION FOR CLASSIFYING DIFFERENT FACETS OF ANIMALITY?

The idea of “moral agency” resumes similar anthropocentric allocations in terms of biological and cultural demarkers, such as the conservative (species-hierarchical) hypotheses about Nonhumans have done.

The construction of “morality” as an act, should however ideally draw on non-anthropocentric perspectivic angles, to enable itself to touch upon the grounds of the large spectrum of co-existential modalities.

Questions:

1.) Which features, abilities and attributes are typically assumed as making up “animal agency” and, respectively, as typically making up “not-animal-agency”?

2.) On which criterions do these classifications base?

3.) What would a map of “animal agency” look like from a nonanthopocentric perspective?

TIERAUTONOMIE / Gruppe Messel

Mitgefühl als bedingter Gerechtigkeitsaspekt

Überlegung zu: Pazifismus

Zum Schutz von Leben hat Mitgefühl erst dann einen effektiven Sinn, wenn die Gerechtigkeit als Inhalt und Ziel dabei nicht aus den Augen verloren wird.

(HUMANITY) Im rechtlich durch Menschenrechtskonventionen abgesichterten Bereich, braucht das sensible Gleichgewicht des „Friedens“ eine gewisse Absicherung durch Maßnahmen, die „schützende Gewalt“ nicht immer und nicht gänzlich ausschließen.

(ANIMALITY) Im Falle oppressiver Gewalt gegen Nichtmenschen erwarten wir von Menschen die Freiwilligkeit und appellieren an das Mitgefühl, weil wir die Nichtmenschen in einer speziesistischen Gesellschaft und Welt gegenwärtig auf keiner gesellschaftlich und politisch konstituierten rechtlichen Grundlage schützen können.

Mitgefühl allein reicht in der Konfrontation mit nakter Gewalt aber in keiner Form aus.

Die einzige Grundlage, die eine Chance auf das Recht des Schutzes vor Gewalt (systemischer oder individueller Natur) bietet, ist die grundlegende Einforderung von Gerechtigkeit.

(Pazifismus im Kontext mit‚Humanity’ und ‚Animality’ als politisch definitorische Bereiche.)

TIERAUTONOMIE / Gruppe Messel

What is Animality, and what it isn’t

You are at risk of engaging in rhetorical branding if:

… ANIMALITY equals:

pigeonholing nonhuman animal otherness in (philosophical, religious, scientific, biologistic, aesthetic, anthropologic) terms of excluding zoopolitical spaces of animal autonomy.

… and if HUMANITY amounts to:

“we”, the “Homo sapiens”.

A new discourse needs fresh approaches – not just a new labelling system for an ongoing current of stable fallacies.

 

We speak with each other, somehow

First I ought to say I hope that nobody who might be picking up on this will be trying to take the issue in a simplisitc way. It is in no regards.

I’ve discussed the theme of ANIMAL LANGUAGES before in an essay I wrote a couple of years ago, and I am coming back to this topic in form of a additional project that I want to start on this site:

A Human + Nonhuman mutual translation project.

This is gonna be difficult, because I don’t want to imposed neither any potentially restricitve definitions on my nonhuman fellows that I am working with, nor do I want to cater to the chorus of voices who seek to belittle Nonhumans on the basis of their cultures and languages being different and for us not translatable.

But right here I must pause, because: why can’t we translate Nonhuman Animals?

As I previoulsy suggested, as anti-speciesist I don’t see a difference when it comes to trying to unserstand “my opposite” – I think we can try to understand each other possibly, if we come to see our own language (and parameters) as relative.

I come from a non- or der anti-biologistic and anti-humancentric approach, and I only want to turn my views into public input, because it is horrifically ridiculous and more than that tragic, that we narrow down the idea of language to a contemporary and highly restricted definition of the term.

Animals …

We speak. We all have different approaches of how we try to understand each other, but to draw a line based on biology is problematic, as long as we fail to question that parameter of explanation.

I suggest to get away from any speciesist paradigm (see fragment of forms of speciesism) and use plain and naked reason to find solitions to accepting communication as a fact in itself (without further reproach to explicability within a humancentric dominant context) and I believe a broadened classification of ‘language” in terms of our own human language even is needed, and which can’t aswell be narrowed down to a set of neurological and technical terms.

 

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists.

From a recent discussion / Gruppe Messel

This Text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Two debates, the same problem with speciesist rhetorics blurring out a reasonable, coherent discourse.

A.)   The (unfortunately) highly controversial debate about Halal and Kosher slaughter methods.

B.)   The ‘humane meat’ marketing campaigns, using Animal Welfare as the as a vehicle for their sales boosting.

In both these speciesist segments – the one religious, the other one more plain-culturally based – you face an upholding of speciesist ideological tenets, additionally to the front-fight of defending a speciesist practice.

Why are we discussing these two examples of speciesist praxes?

Pro-arguments defending these two praxes, that are finding their basis in cultural reception, have permeated the AR debate to some extent on outreach strategies in regards to multiculturalism and culture – assuming “traditions” to be fixed societal phenomena/entities, immune to continuous ethical historical change.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of A.):

The basic argument from an AR side defending religious slaughter methods, as no less “cruel” than pre-stun methods, goes that Nonhumans suffer either way, conditions in slaughterhouses might even be worse, at least as bad, and that all slaughter must stop.

Usually missed in this string of argumentation is a more detailed critique why e.g. slaughterhouses such as those designed by Temple Grandin are for example “as bad” as religious slaughter methods: So called “humane” slaughter methods have to be criticized and critically examined in their own respect.

The argument against the relativization of ‘different speciesist practices’ as in the case A.) from an AR position can be:

Why are we fighting to be able to film abuse in factory farms, when in the end of the day the comparably more abusive form of “handling” does not make any difference at all? After all we are always trying to alleviate any comparably more “extreme” forms of suffering in a situation where we can’t stop speciesism overnight. We do that, alongside with campaigning for veganism!

The trap with religious animal killing practices is that the degree to which killing becomes a deed of “good” is mostly being overlooked let alone critically discussed. Can you really expect strict believers to end killing Nonhumans, if it’s on behalf of an “almighty God” who decrees you to do so?

From an AR point of view we would say that no religion/religious tradition/belief whatsoever must come before either Animal Rights or Human Rights, equally.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of B.):

Anecdotal example: A German animal advocacy group advertises for “humane meat” with the slogan: “For a life before becoming meat” (http://www.provieh.de/downloads_provieh/01_ki_schweine.pdf, 5/11/14), the same slogan is being used by the Austrian Green Party (http://www.gruene.at/europa/2-welle,5/11/14).

The problem being that cultural tenets of speciesism are not questioned, nor what strategies are effective at what given context. Strategies and analyses seem to fall short to a short-term mass-movement idea and behaviour within the AR community.

– There is no clear line drawn towards the impacts of what comes along as cultural heritage.

– Activists fight against the symptoms, not the cultural roots of speciesist rethorics that enables speciesist practices to be culturally active.

On one hand “humane slaughter” advocacy has moved “down”, in terms of Animal Advocacy ideals, to some of the “stricter” Animal Welfare organizations, like the CIWF with for example their recent campaign “Better-Chicken.org”: it seems that such welfarist pro “humane meat” campaigns throw the baby out of with the bathwater, since instead of trying to seek alleviating suffering with the goal of ending speciesism overall as a target, they are of course prolonging speciesist culture.

However, AR advocates who do distance themselves from such campaigns, seem to fail to address (analytically and strategically) how important it is to target the functionality of speciesism and its rhetoric in the plain culturally-based sense.

– AR places its critique more at the sociological and the psychological level, not as much on the anthropological and cultural level, and when at least not with a distanced view.

– A question would be e.g.: How does the argument “I only buy organic humanely slaughtered meat” set in? Why is it accepted in society seen from a cultural / anthropological critical perspective?

This type of question has to be contextualized with how a culture works, and how the individual takes a role within this cultural setting for example.

 

Seeing Big Birds

More on: Animal Portrayals.

Big bird cartoon by Ken Eaton

The family of the big walking birds, like the Moas (extinct), Nandus, Emus, Ostriches, Elephant Birds (Aepyornis maximus, extict). They tend to be seen only in regards to their being different than the “typical” flying birds, and their size is highlighted as if they had something absurd about them.

Table I.

We attribute certain animals to certain stances we have towards them; each species, each subspecies, has a certain box that a “human cultural context” holds ready for them.

We lack the ethical barrier, the healthy taboo, to understand that nonhumans are not to be threatened, ridiculed, hated, and relegated into irrelevancy if we want to have a comprehensive ethical outlook on the world – the kind of taboos we have learned and are constantly in a process of learning when we face each other.

Table II.

Seeing nonhuman animals of today, we like to relate them to their ancestors in a fascinated yet freak-show-like way: we look how they compare in sizes, who ate who, and why they wouldn’t “survive” or evoluted, we say they look or looked “weird” or awesome. 

 Table III.

In past cultures and civilizations nonhumans were perceived with myth. Now, even extinct and ancient animals that we have never seen in real life, are placed by us into this taboo free zone, where we feel they reinforce our current objectifying speciesist attitudes.

Images:

TableI.:

“Bones from the moa – a large, flightless and extinctNew Zealandbird – were collected from the early 19th century. Public servant and naturalist Walter Mantell was an important collector of moa bones. He sent large collections to Richard Owen of theBritishMuseum, who was the first scientist to identify moa species. Here, Mantell is fancifully depicted perched on a partly skeletal moa. The document under his arm refers to his government work setting aside land reserves for Māori.”

http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/artwork/37312/walter-mantell-riding-a-moa

Table II.:

Hundsköpfige, Kopflose, Einäugige, Fußschattner (Herodot), Ident.Nr. VIII A 1607. Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Ethnologisches Museum.

http://www.smb-digital.de/eMuseumPlus?service=ExternalInterface&module=collection&objectId=617600

Table III.:

“A rock painting that appears to be of a bird that went extinct about 40,000 years ago has been discovered in northern Australia. If confirmed, this would be the oldest rock art anywhere in the world, pre-dating the famous Chauvet cave in southern France by some 7,000 years.”

http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/news/2010/06/bird-rock-art-could-be-worlds-oldest/

All links: 20. March 2014

 

Animal Knowledge

Animal Knowledge

Palang LY

This text as a PDF (Link opens in a new window)

It’s astonishing, why are we willing to accept that the burden of proof lies with the nonhuman animals and their allies, to make clear who they are, when a human-centred society doesn’t even have the will and ability to see the full spectrum. Why do we, their allies, bow in to human methods of research on things that can’t be proven and that don’t have to be proven?

Their individual life’s dignity does not need to be proven; it needs to be acknowledged, without restrictive conditions.

What the AR community should learn is to claim the rights, the foundation of dignity, the freedom that really lies outside of paradigms that were (and are) installed to quite contrarily draw lines as aggressive borders.

We tie our human standards and insights on a.) language and b.) on our specific capacity to utilize nature, and we see both these things as qualifiers that are intertied: Language plus the capacity to utilize nature as a resource!

It never occurs to us that other beings could have a more sustainable and clearly wise concept of how to live on planet earth, that their ancestral relation over millions of years has given them insight on how to interact in other ways with nature and their natural environment.

We would deny that, because we don’t accept that nonhumans have concepts. We think concepts can only occur with certain qualifiers … , and we think that nature couldn’t have possibly taught nonhuman animal ancestors things they decidedly built their cultures on.

We think nonhuman animals don’t decide these things.

I could go on, but my point is that we as AR people err so bad, because we don’t want to take the stance that would make us jump in the cold water of radical new perspectives in terms of: de-humanfocusing and thus deconstructing sources we refer to as basis of knowledge about life.

We keep putting new wine into old bottles when we don’t come up with a new architecture of basic knowledge.

 

Animal Thealogy: Man-Machine? Animal Reason!


Io – Farangis G Yegane

Animal Thealogy:

Man-Machine? Animal Reason!

Palang LY

This text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

The basic question about the categorical division into (nonhuman) “animals” and “humans” (Homo sapiens), brings up probably before the question of its moral implications, the question about what exactly hides beneath both these big generalized identities.

Why has the view about that what-animals-are and that what-humans-are finally lead to us only viewing animals under biological terms today?

Is it enough to attribute only an instinctual behaviour to nonhuman animals?

Is it thus the ‘fault’ of animals that humans won’t relate to them in any further way than how they are relating to them today?

What other options are there?

Animal = instinctual? Human = reasoning? Attributed identities in a human-centered narrative

If we don’t accept the view that nonhuman animals are those who have to stand below humans, within a frame given by e.g. a biological, philosophical or even divine hierarchy-of-being, then such a claim doesn’t have to be solely morally motivated. It can also mean that we question the way in which both identities („animal“ and „human“) are understood, that we question the separation and qualifications of these identities, even before the questions of our wrongdoings enter the floor of debate.

We can ask if the interpretation of the characteristics that are considered to make up the marking dividers within a human-animal hierarchy, are in reality a negation of the autonomous value of otherness in nonhuman animals.

We know that the single criterion that serves as our standard, is the human parameter, i.e. the human model counts as the ideal, as the standard, for creating norms.

So what happens if we put this standard of measurement into doubt?

It’s a question of perspective!

Conclusions deduced in the fields of biology and psychology, with those being the main academic sectors that deal with the explicability of animal identity, nail the perspectives:

  1. on relevant characteristics
  2. on how animal characteristics (in either, the case of humans or nonhuman animals) have to a.) express themselves and b.) in which exact correlation they have to become „measurable“, in order to reach a certain relevance or meaningfulness from a human point of perspective.

So the problem lies in the question why humans won’t accept nonhuman animal autonomy when it can’t be made fathomable through the perception of a value-defined comparison.

Why are own animal criterions and why is their independent meaningfulness (for the sake of themselves and for their situation within their natural and social inter- and co-specific contexts) rendered irrelevant, when they cross our perspectivical glance, and when these animal criteria could also be understood and accepted to fully lay outside of our hierarchical-framework?

Animal individuality

To be willing to accept an autonomous meaningfulness of nonhuman animals, means to question the deindividualization, that our views and explanations about nonhuman animals purport.

Those are the views that allow us to set nonhuman animals in comparison to us, as ‘the human group’ of identity, instead of seeing otherness in itself as a full value. And those are also the views that seek to sort out how the existential ‘meaning’ of nonhuman animals might relate to anything that matters to us “humans” as a closed group of identity.

The deindividualized view of nonhuman animals almost automatically goes along with the subtraction of value in terms of attributed meaningfulness, and so we land at the moral question now, as the question of identities, individual existence and deinidivdualisation pose some ethical conflicts.

Nonhuman animals, and the attributed identities in the fields of “animal” and “human” social contexts

If we can view nonhuman animals, apart from their localization in the realm of biology, for example also in a sociological context, then we could ask the question: „How do people act towards nonhumans animals?“

Can we explain the behaviour of humans towards nonhuman animals solely by referring to the common notion that one can’t really behave in any particular way towards nonhuman animals because they are supposedly ‘instinctively set’ and ‘communicatively restricted’ compared to us, and that thus our behaviour towards them can’t contain an own quality of a social dynamic?

Can we legitimate our typically human social misbehaviour towards nonhuman animals by referring to the „stupidity“ that we interpret into nonhuman animal behaviour?

(Such questions would of course only feed themselves on stereotypes of animal identity, no matter from where they stem.)

However we probably can’t ask any of such questions a sociologist, though it could fall into their scope to analyse these relationships. Sociologists likely would prefer to deal with the Animal Rights movement and not deal with the interaction between humans and nonhuman animals, since everyone seems to be with the fact that a natural science, biology, has already determined what the identity of nonhuman animals “factually” is. And it must be said that even the Animal Rights movement seems the place moral question somewhere almost out of reach by accepting the explanation of the identity of animals as something more or less strictly biological.

***

A geometrical image

Imagine two abstract groups. Group A consists of triangles and everything that surrounds them becomes mathematically relevant to their own triangular form. This happens as all that either resembles or does not resemble a triangle appears in a certain colour.

Group B are circles.

Now group A says that group B aren’t triangles (because A are triangles) and that B also weren’t squares or rectangles.

Does any reason follow from this that would mathematically legitimate for the circles to be excluded as equally valid geometrical figures?

The triangles are different compared to the circles, but both are geometrical figures and insofar of an equal value.

They can be correlated due to each of their geometrical qualities, even when the circles do not match the characteristics of the triangles!

Let’s take this as our metaphor

Sociology does not question the social interaction between humans and nonhuman animals. They don’t scrutinize that relation from their viewpoint, because the view held on the human relation towards animals is already set in its core by the natural sciences.

The hierarchical empire built by the natural sciences though [and along with it the humanistic knowledge on which the natural sciences base upon] rules every need for any further examination and consideration of this relationship out. We do not see the direct relation between humans and nonhuman animals.

A most typical exemplification of that inability to relate on a basic and fundamental level of ‘common sense’ can be pinpointed in the difference between relating to nonhuman animals in terms of “joy” versus “love”: as in “animals equally feel joy” or “we can both love”, and “pain” versus “violence”: as in: “animals can equally feel pain” or “we can both experience violence”. Love is a intermittent sentiment, violence also basis on social interactivity (though in that negative sense), where as “joy” is located only in the subject we attribute the feeling to, and the same goes for “pain”.

We – nonhuman animals and humans – understand the questions of LOVE and VIOLENCE. Whereby “joy” and “pain” are reductionary names for the “same” thing.

Regarding the question whether animals can be regarded in any way as moral agents, one has to ask, does moral exist outside the human concept of morality?

When we discuss morality we presume that the substance matter which the term comprises came into life through our perceptions, and because we define what „moral“ means, we can claim a described phenomenon as solely ours.

What does morality consist of?

Does morality solely exist because of a theoretical framework? One can doubt that. Morality on the one side has something to do with basic social interaction, through that morality gains value.

On the other side are the superordinate agreements about morality, which are declared and decided upon by an elite or defining group/process, but through that the agreements about morality only contain a forced validity, which is disconnected from its own basis, that is: the meaning of social interaction between beings (i.e. the construct about morality excludes that what lays outside of its hierarchy, other forms of interaction that contain „social values“ ).

On the individual plane exists that what any “I” perceives and experiences in her lived interactions and experiences as „morally okay“. And that can be between nonhuman animals or humans in the whole environmental context – seen from a common sense point of view if we take the human view.

When we discard the human decorum that surrounds and sticks to the word morality, we can say that every action has a moral implication, non-anthropocentrically seen.

It’s always the same: otherness. We have to accept it.

Animals have a very different philosophy-of-living in a neutral comparison to our philosophy of life, and I believe one can use the term philosophy here to describe the yet unnamed phenomenon in nonhumans animals of how they structure and perceive their own lives.

I ask myself whether the human problem with nonhuman animals isn’t rather to be found in the differences of their philosophies-of-life when compared to our typically human ones.

The problems lie much more in this radical otherness from us, than in the reasons of gradual biological differences or in the often assumed moral impotence on this other one’s (the animal’s) behalf.

The problem thus seems to fluctuate around the scope of difference and coinciding similarity. In many aspects we equal nonhumans animals a lot, but in the aspect of our dominance claim finally, we see nonhuman animals as „the losers“, the bottom of the evolutionary or divinely ordained hierarchical order on which we can postulate our violent and hypocritical sense of power.

That nonhuman animals are the losers amongst the biological animals is even an attitude that some of their advocates purport. I often meet people who won’t reckon a unique, self-sufficient quality seen to be in the closeness and distance amongst the different animals (including human animals). In the forefront of every argumentation there is always: how are they in comparison to us. As if humans and nonhuman animals had to compete on an „equal” scale … and another related argumentation goes: how much of their „instinct“ could possibly entitle them to be granted rights; right that would protect them from humans (whereby it is highly questionable whether those who have prejudices against you, can really grant you your own rights.)

Human society, it seems, will always consider the „us“ and the „we“ as objectively more important, insofar as the „we“, the how „we are“, is the criterion, and nonhumans animals are measured against it.

The crucial point is to accept others and to accept the validity of otherness. For the others and maybe even for us!

Reaching far? Animal Thealogy – female animal deities, female human deities, on the terms of such angles.

Painting: Io by intersectional antispeciesist veg*AR artist Farangis G. Yegane – Lebensschutz!

 

“Joy” and “pain” are reductionary concepts about the rainbow shadedness of animal sentience

The independence of Animal Liberation

We – nonhuman animals and humans – understand the questions of LOVE and VIOLENCE. Whereby “joy” and “pain” are reductionary names for the “same” thing.

Fragment as a PDF (link opens in new window)

A liberation that depends on an approval by scientists? Or alternatively on a religious doctrine?

Sentience can’t be only fathomed by suffering or joy – it’s rainbow shaded.

Sensuality

The separation of sensuality and reason is a man-made one. And tied inasmuch to scientific shortsightedness as to the religiously driven degradation of the earthenly versus the notion of an elated human spirit.

Both anthropocentric paradigms – be they through the lens of objectivism that works within an anthropocentric framework, or the lens of an arbitrariness in the spiritual spheres – any severely anthropocentric paradigm, deconstructs the holistic body and mind connection … for reasons, obviously.

The problem lies with our constructs, and not with animal reality!

Painting: Spanish Dog by Farangis G. Yegane

 

Animal Thealogy: Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (Part 2)


Io – Farangis G Yegane

Animal Thealogy:

Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (2)

(And this was part one of that text.)

Palang LY

A geometrical image

Imagine two abstract groups. Group A consists of triangles and everything that surrounds them becomes mathematically relevant to their own triangular form. This happens as all that either resembles or does not resemble a triangle appears in a certain colour.

Group B are circles.

Now group A says that group B aren’t triangles (because A are triangles) and that B also weren’t squares or rectangles.

Does any reason follow from this that would mathematically legitimate for the circles to be excluded as equally valid geometrical figures?

The triangles are different compared to the circles, but both are geometrical figures and insofar of an equal value.

They can be correlated due to each of their geometrical qualities, even when the circles do not match the characteristics of the triangles!

Let’s take this as our metaphor

Sociology does not question the social interaction between humans and nonhuman animals. They don’t scrutinize that relation from their viewpoint, because the view held on the human relation towards animals is already set in its core by the natural sciences.

The hierarchical empire built by the natural sciences though [and along with it the humanistic knowledge on which the natural sciences base upon] rules every need for any further examination and consideration of this relationship out. We do not see the direct relation between humans and nonhuman animals.

A most typical exemplification of that inability to relate on a basic and fundamental level of ‘common sense’ can be pinpointed in the difference between relating to nonhuman animals in terms of “joy” versus “love”: as in “animals equally feel joy” or “we can both love”, and “pain” versus “violence”: as in: “animals can equally feel pain” or “we can both experience violence”. Love is a intermittent sentiment, violence also basis on social interactivity (though in that negative sense), where as “joy” is located only in the subject we attribute the feeling to, and the same goes for “pain”.

We – nonhuman animals and humans – understand the questions of LOVE and VIOLENCE. Whereby “joy” and “pain” are reductionary names for the “same” thing.

Regarding the question whether animals can be regarded in any way as moral agents, one has to ask, does moral exist outside the human concept of morality?

When we discuss morality we presume that the substance matter which the term comprises came into life through our perceptions, and because we define what „moral“ means, we can claim a described phenomenon as solely ours.

What does morality consist of?

Does morality solely exist because of a theoretical framework? One can doubt that. Morality on the one side has something to do with basic social interaction, through that morality gains value.

On the other side are the superordinate agreements about morality, which are declared and decided upon by an elite or defining group/process, but through that the agreements about morality only contain a forced validity, which is disconnected from its own basis, that is: the meaning of social interaction between beings (i.e. the construct about morality excludes that what lays outside of its hierarchy, other forms of interaction that contain „social values“ ).

On the individual plane exists that what any “I” perceives and experiences in her lived interactions and experiences as „morally okay“. And that can be between nonhuman animals or humans in the whole environmental context – seen from a common sense point of view if we take the human view.

When we discard the human decorum that surrounds and sticks to the word morality, we can say that every action has a moral implication, non-anthropocentrically seen.

It’s always the same: otherness. We have to accept it.

Animals have a very different philosophy-of-living in a neutral comparison to our philosophy of life, and I believe one can use the term philosophy here to describe the yet unnamed phenomenon in nonhumans animals of how they structure and perceive their own lives.

I ask myself whether the human problem with nonhuman animals isn’t rather to be found in the differences of their philosophies-of-life when compared to our typically human ones.

The problems lie much more in this radical otherness from us, than in the reasons of gradual biological differences or in the often assumed moral impotence on this other one’s (the animal’s) behalf.

The problem thus seems to fluctuate around the scope of difference and coinciding similarity. In many aspects we equal nonhumans animals a lot, but in the aspect of our dominance claim finally, we see nonhuman animals as „the losers“, the bottom of the evolutionary or divinely ordained hierarchical order on which we can postulate our violent and hypocritical sense of power.

That nonhuman animals are the losers amongst the biological animals is even an attitude that some of their advocates purport. I often meet people who won’t reckon a unique, self-sufficient quality seen to be in the closeness and distance amongst the different animals (including human animals). In the forefront of every argumentation there is always: how are they in comparison to us. As if humans and nonhuman animals had to compete on an „equal” scale … and another related argumentation goes: how much of their „instinct“ could possibly entitle them to be granted rights; right that would protect them from humans (whereby it is highly questionable whether those who have prejudices against you, can really grant you your own rights.)

Human society, it seems, will always consider the „us“ and the „we“ as objectively more important, insofar as the „we“, the how „we are“, is the criterion, and nonhumans animals are measured against it.

The crucial point is to accept others and to accept the validity of otherness. For the others and maybe even for us!

Reaching far? Animal Thealogy – female animal deities, female human deities, on the terms of such angles.

 

The problems we cause for animals and for each other, and the fine distinction

Late night rambling, please excuse the roughness

Two things

A.) Elitism in the vegan movement

B.) Eliminating animal death is one thing, but as far as our inner conflicts as a human society are concerned (capitalism, socialism questions) we should first think about our GREED (as a trait and character deformity that counts as normal today) before we put the discardment of animal products alongside on the shelf with some of the symptoms of intra-human social injustice.

The ‘new animal’ first!

Can we rightly say it’s the same to exclude animal products for ethical reasons and addressing our inner human political and social crisis? What causes a intra-human political and social crisis? In the end of the day it’s each of us and how we shape daily life in every possible step, and also how we seek to shape our careers, that directly impacts the social and political dilemmas.

EVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION is the disastrous link between the misery we impose upon nonhuman animals and our societal and individual self-definitions as the human group.

There is morally no way round to primarily address animal issues alongside an aim of a new ‘enlightenment’ that progresses but also alters term of ‘human’ (animal!) freedom. Since animals are our co-beings that we draw into the total catastrophe without any ethical legitimization whatsoever, animal rights will redefine much of our cultural self understanding/s.

We have to stop leading our personal lives and our collective goals so, that we keep on with the exploitation and the destruction of the free natural space that is originally and rightly the animal habitat! Separating the notion of an intact animal habitat (nature) from our rights-self-definition would throw us back into a heavily anthropocentrist thinking.

We should really rethink how we as humans act, on every scale! What we likely consider to be NORMAL, is likely in reality homocentrist/anthropocentrist selfishness and destructivity. When we step out of this “NORMALITY” and lead an UNNORMAL way of life, we don’t even accept that we might be doing the only thing that will open our sight, since we got so used to the narrowmindedness of ‘being human’ and not our (very individual and perhaps in this world lonely) selves. We need to have courage – again, and again and again. Against all “odds”!

And I have to note: Elitism in the vegan and animal advocacy movement … In one sentence, I don’t think elitism helps on the long run with a liberation movement.

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

Palang LY

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

There so far is no such thing as a “positive” veganic (which means: organic vegan agriculture) Animal Rights consciousness.

Not taking into consideration that nonhuman animals must be helped by all possible means, here looks to me like a form of speciesism might be lurking in the background, since if humans where in a comparable plight, anybody who would describe him-/herself as a non- misanthrope would help the humans in question.

What I am mainly interested in is:

Why doesn’t it occur to vegans and the veganic (vegan organic) movement, that humans and nonhuman animals can co-exist, can co-live without exploitation, as an option?

I have looked at various veganic projects, and as far as one can see, “animal rights” only plays a role in the way, that exploitation and usage of animals and animal products / fertilizer derived from animals is non-permitted, on ethical grounds, mainly. Hence, these people are VEGANS, and not just any people avoiding animal products: They avoid animal exploitation. That’s the Animal Rights part of the veganic movement.

But apart from that, the very nonhuman animals that we as VEGANS want to HELP, don’t come in or become visible or noticed as beings that we are willing to live together with, that we are willing to share the earth with. As if the soil and the forests were ours to use, ours to live on, ours to say what’s right to do with it (“it” … that is: nature).

Billions of animals

Of course the forceful exploitation of the reproductive system of animals has to stop. Of course any form of overpopulation is bad for anybody and this planet. But the lives, that didn’t chose to come into this world, the lives that just happen to find themselves here – we do have to ethically respect the fact that these individuals exist.

Sanctuaries and vegan farming should merge I believe! To cut a long “story” short and practical.

But back to veganic-ism as it is

There is the mention of using human manure and faeces for fertilization (apart from the much more promising sounding self-fertilizing gardening methods which exist in veganicism too of course). But if people are willing to use their own manure, as part of the biological process of vegan agriculture, can’t the idea of “the sanctuary” and the idea of a newly veganic option be created in peoples minds? People can tolerate their own manure somewhere, but not another (nonhuman) animal’s manure? I think we cannot say that it is speciesist and exploitative if both humans and nonhuman animals live together in a natural space without harming or exploiting or using each other.

We as vegans ought to LIVE together with the other animals on this planet, in a peaceful manner, in mixed communities. If we can’t develop a consciousness for that, we fail at creating a (more complete) positive ethic. It’s enormously tragic that we let the speciesist view of “animals, us and the world” win insofar, that this view manages to inspire us vegans not to willingly plan to live together with the so called farm animals in a vegan, caring manner, with a strong will to co-exist.

Are the only options we can chose from the one of degrading nonhuman animals or otherwise totally excluding them, and making them nonexistent in a (desired utopian) daily reality? No, really, because this planet is also an animals’ planet!

Ethics … To me the veganic movement makes itself look as if it creates and expresses a bifurcation in what veganism ideally should mean. As good at it looks now and as much as such farming practices are heading for the major part in a promising and important and ethically inevitable direction, the veganic code of ethics nevertheless ignores an important factor and that is, again, to include all animals in a life affirming way.

This fallacy in the veganic vegan understanding makes vegans overall look as if this movement was basically about clearing nonhuman animals in their positives – and as living facts and individual fates – simply out of our lives!

I think there is morally something going drastically wrong with us.

This text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

PETA und die Tiereuthanasie

PETA und die Tiereuthanasie … Forsetzung (3)

(2) Was ist los mit PETA? PETA und der Vorwurf der unnötigen Tiereuthanasie
http://simorgh.de/niceswine/was_ist_los_mit_peta
(1) Im Zusammenhang mit der Diskussion über die Position und die Aktivitäten der Organisation PETA im Bezug auf Tierheime und Euthanasie … PETAs gute kleine Soldaten
http://simorgh.de/niceswine/peta_und_tiereuthanasie

Warum töten PETA Tiere? Warum fällt so wenig Kritik an dieser Art der Vorgehensweise im Tierheimmanagement, auch von Seiten der Tierrechtler?

Nach Jahren der Bemühungen darum, PETA zu einer anderen Herangehensweise an das Problem heimatloser und streunender Tiere zu bewegen, zeichnet sich ab, dass PETA nicht dazu bereit sind ihre eingefleische Vorstellung, Euthanasie sei eine gute Lösung, zu ändern.

PETA können sich diesen Standpunkt allerdings nur leisten, weil einerseits die anderen großen Tierschutzorganisationen in den USA (wie die ASPCA und die HSUS) den gleichen Standpunkt einnehmen und Tiere routinemäßig einschläfern, und weil andererseits – und das ist ein viel wichtigerer Grund – Euthanasie im Bezug auf Tiere bereits von den Veterinärmedizinern als eine humane Allroundlösung für Tiere „im Notfall“ betrachtet wird: Für die Tiere, die in unserer Gesellschaft zum Problem werden, weil sie nicht mehr in unser System passen, ohne einen Menschen bei seiner täglichen Routine zu stören.

Der gegenwärtige Trend in der Sterbehilfe-Debatte humanmedizinischer Ethik darf uns nicht darüber hinwegtäuschen, dass die „Endlösung Euthanasie“ beim Tier hingegen im Durschnitt nicht mehr bedeutet als das: „Ich kann das Tier nicht leiden sehen.“ Das heißt die Verweigerung des Einsaztes von Palliativa in der Veterinärmedizin. Und, wie im Falle der sinnlosen Einschläferungen in so vielen Tierheimen weltweit: „Ein totes Tier ist ein gutes Tier.“ Denn es gibt keinen Platz in der Grasswurzelpolitikebene für des Menschen beste Freunde (als die wir, die Menschen, unsere „Haustiere“ ja eingentlich betrachten).

Es finden sich kaum Veterinärmediziner die zögerlich an das Einschläfern herangehen. Jeder, der einmal ein Haustier „besessen“ hat kennt das Problem: der Gang zum Tierarzt mit einem erkrankten Tier, ist eigentlich wie ein Gang zum Hänker. Denn wenn der Tierarzt das Verdikt fällt, dass sich eine Weiterbehandlung hier nicht mehr lohnt, dann sind sowohl Tierpatient als auch das Herrchen oder Frauchen in einer final tragischen Sackgasse gelandet. Wenn Sie die Frage nach lebenserhaltenden und schmerzstillenden, angstnehmeden Alternativen stellen, dann sind sie damit in der Veterinärmedizin bislang noch fehlt am Platz.

Man müsste nun auf die Mitverantwortung der Philosophie, das heißt der Ethiker, und der Biologie, als der Wissenschaft des organischen Lebens, zu sprechen kommen, denn genau hier endet man in der Suche nach dem Grund für diesen Unterschied, der so grundlegend zwischen der Humanmedizin, die lebenserhaltend agiert, und in der Tiermedizin liegt, die sich eingentlich nur um das Nötigste kümmern kann.

Ein Tier, so die führenden Philosophen und Bio-Ethiker, verliere weniger als ein Mensch, wenn es stirbt.

Diese Grundhaltung im Denken der Experten und derjenigen Menschen die diese Experten nicht kritisch hinterfragen möchten, bringt nun auch mit sich, dass sich bei PETA in der absehbaren Zukunft kaum etwas ändern wird, und dass Gruppen, wie der No Kill Adovcacy Center noch viele, viele Steine aus dem Weg zu rollen haben. Aber auch wir müssen in diesem Punkt aktiv werden, um ein Umdenken in der zugrundeliegenden Ethik mit anzustoßen.

Dieser Text als PDF (Link öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

From individual to individual

Speciesism and homocentrism are the external manifestations of patterns in thinking that deny animal intelligence, and instead overvalue human intelligence. Humans are mostly behaving contractualist, unpredictable, unreliable, unfair, … and the list could go on in pretty negative terms. I wonder why that is the case, and I think it does not have to be that way.

I think it is possible for a human to be ‘animal intelligent’, to be non-contractualist, predictable, fair, tolerant, loving, … and that list could go on in positive terms. From my experiences with animals I learned about the possibility of ‘animal intelligence’:  The animals I have lived with truly were my best friends.

I think for a person who is truly nonspeciesistic in his/her thoughts and critical about homocentrism  it should be technically possible to really make the shift and start to become a better individual than what humans have per definition been so far, and even prided themselves with.

The time of human intelligence is over for me.

I am glad I defend animal rights from a standpoint of true ‘animal independence’ (of any human paradigm: biology, ethology, philosophy, religion … ).

***

Fragmentary thoughts:

The border around the castle ‘HUMAN’ is the one of scientifical categorizing. Within the castle we claim to be ‘complete’.

BIOLOGICAL HIERARCHISM ALWAYS PUTS HUMAN ‘OBJECTIVITY’ ON TOP OF WHAT IT DENIES THE OTHER SPEICIES: THAT IS ON TOP OF ANIMALS’ OBJECTIVITY

How can absolute objectivity be captured? With which parameters to measure against? Humans’ objectivity claim relies on subjective interests.

Ethical behaviour is one of the components taken out of the frame of an allround objectivity.

Animals get denied for their actions to be viewed as not insinctual.

Subsequently the VALUES of behaviour get ruled out from being within the ethcial scale of social actions between the species, etc.

A term such as ‘ethical’ desribes something that is existent, it’s not an idea in itself – otherwise it would not exist in the correlations…

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Die zerstörende Gewalt. Der Überlaufeffekt oder die Einmaligkeit in der Vorkommnis von Gewalt?

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Vorab: Braucht die Situation des Mensch-Tier-Verhältnisses einen Vergleich zu menschlich intraspezifischenen Situationen zur Hervorhebung von moralischer Relevanz? Wenn nicht, wozu dann die Genozidvergleiche in bezug auf die Situation des Verhältnisses menschlich-destruktiven Verhaltens gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren?

Das Hauptargument, das gegen Genozidvergleiche vorgebracht wird, liegt im Punkt der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen. Eine ausschließliche Zurückführung auf den Begriff der Würde, kann, als ethisches Kriterium, aber nicht zur Ableitung einer einseitigen moralischen Gewichtung angeführt werden, ohne dass dabei eine Abwertung der Problematik der Gewalthandlungen gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere vollzogen wird.

In der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen und dem Problem der Verbrechen gegen die Menschenwürde (gegen die Menschheit oder einen Menschen) liegt keine zwangsläufige ethische Implikation im Bezug auf das Verhältnis des Menschen zu seiner Außen- oder Umwelt, die zu einer allgemeinen Begründbarkeit von Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren führbar wäre oder diese Formen von Gewalt ausdrücklich und in jedem Fall sanktionieren würde.

Der Begriff der Würde kann, gesehen vom Standpunkt der Meinungsfreiheit, auch nicht strikt in seiner Gebundenheit reduziert werden, ohne dass man dabei das Recht auf freie Meinungsäußerung verletzen würde. Dass heißt, dass eine Auffassung eines Menschen über das Vorhandensein der Würde der nichtmenschlichen Tiere – solange er dadurch keinem Menschen schadet, oder Menschen oder einem Menschen dadurch Gewalt antut – in den Bereich seiner Gedankenfreiheit oder seiner freien Meinungsauffassung fällt.

Menschen werden auch als Opfer und auch als Täter als Würdewesen betrachtet, deren Würde man in den Fällen von Morden und Genoziden brechen wollte; zumindest wurde dies in der Menschheitsgeschichte immer wieder versucht.

Tieren wurde in der Menschheitsgeschichte von keiner Gesellschaft eine Würde einer Unantasbarkeit ihres Tierseins zuerteilt. Damit ist die Besonderheit der Tragweite ihrer Opferposition nicht problemlos mit derer menschlicher Opfer zu vergleichen.

In jeder Situation, in der ein Gewaltverübender ein Opfer schafft, wird man in der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Problem oder dem Fall, Parallelen zu anderen Gewaltsituationen ziehen. Bei Gewalt an sich, unabhängig von der dadurch betroffenen „Angriffsfläche“ oder dem geschaffenen Objekt von Gewalt, kann man vermuten, dass die Motivationen (Destruktivitätswillen, -bereitschaft, gewaltbereite Eigenbezogenheit, Aggression) im Täter übergreifend ähnlich strukturiert sein können, auch weil das letztendliche Ziel oder intendierte Ergebnis von Gewalt: der Mord, die Tötung, d.h. die Zerstörung eines Opfers ist.

Nun verhält es sich aber so, dass die Frage, warum ein Täter sich ein spezifisches Opfer oder eine spezifische Opfergruppe sucht, ganz unterschiedliche Gründe in sich birgt. Auch ist die konkrete Qualität oder Struktur von Gewalt ein maßgeblicher Faktor, der auf die zugundeliegenden Ursachen von Gewalt und die spezifische Gewaltpsychologie zurückschließen lässt.

Produziert gegalt gegen Tiere, Gewalt gegen Menschen? Wenn nicht, warum bestehen dennoch Zusammenhänge in der Gewaltpsychologie

Die Unterscheidungen im Täter-Opfer Verhältnis zwischen potenziellen Opfern, und die Überlappungsmöglichkeiten in der Gewaltbereitschaft ihnen gegenüber, läge in der Frage des sogenannten Spillover-Effekts (Überlaufeffekts):

Die Frage ist, wenn ich dem einen Opfer etwas antue, bin ich dann automatisch auch einem oder mehreren anderen potenziellen Opfern gewaltbereit gegenüber?

Und, dem gegeüberliegend: hat das eine Opfer von Gewalt automatisch dadurch, dass es zum Gewaltopfer wurde, etwas mit einem anderen Opfer einer Form gewaltbereiter Handlung grundlegend gemein, außer dass beide in einer Position des Opfers sind? Liegt irgend etwas auf der Seite des Opfers, das die Gewaltbereitschaft eines Täters auf sich zieht?

Robert Nozick hat die Frage des sogenannten Spillovers vor dem Vordergrund des Mensch-Tier Verhältnisses in der Form beschrieben:

‘[…] Manche sagen, dass Leute nicht so handeln sollten, da solche Handlungen sie brutalisieren und sie die Wahrscheinlichkeit bei der Person erhöhen, das Leben anderer Personen zu nehmen (wir können hinzufügen “oder andererweise zu verletzen”); allein aus der Freude daran. Diese Handlungen, die moralisch nicht an sich in Frage zu stellen sind, sagen sie, haben einen unerwünschten moralischen ‘spillover’ (Überlaufeffekt). (Dinge wären dann anders, wenn es keine Möglichkeit für solch einen ‘spillover’ geben würde – zum Beispiel für die Person, die von sich selber weiß, dass sie die letzte Person auf der Welt ist.) Aber warum sollte es da solch einen ‘spillover’ geben? Wenn es an sich völlig richtig ist, Tieren in irgendeiner Weise etwas anzutun, aus irgendeinem Grund, welchem auch immer, dann, vorausgesetzt eine Person realisiert die klare Linie zwischen Personen und Tieren, und behält dies in ihrem Kopf während sie handelt, warum sollte das Töten von Tieren dazu neigen, sie [die Person] zu brutalisieren und die Wahrscheinlichkeit erhöhen, dass sie [andere] Personen verletzen oder töten könnte? Begehen Metzger mehr Morde? (Als andere Personen die Messer in ihrer Nähe haben?) Wenn es mir Spaß macht einen Baseball fest mit einem Baseballschläger zu schlagen, erhöht dies in bedeutender Weise die Gefahr, dass ich dasselbe mit jemandens Kopf tun würde? Bin ich nicht imstande dazu, zu verstehen, dass sich Leute von Basebällen unterscheiden, und verhindert dieses Verständnis nicht den ‘spillover’? Warum sollten Dinge anders sein im Fall von Tieren. Um es klar zu sagen, es ist eine empirische Frage ob ein ‘spillover’ stattfindet oder nicht; aber es besteht ein Rätsel darüber, warum es das tun sollte.’ (1)

Diese Unterscheidung wird im Falle von nichtmenschlichen Tieren in auffallend deutlicher Weise vollzogen (Speziesismus). Ein Tier physisch zu schädigen oder zu zerstören, es zu töten, verhält sich im Rahmen unserer Gesetze als Sachbeschädigung, nicht als Körperverletzung oder Mord; während das Opfer-werden beim Menschen durch soziale, ethische, religiöse und gesetzliche Konstrukte eine andere Bewertung erhält.

Im Bezug auf Genozide kann man also sagen, die Menschen, die zum Opfer wurden, wurden vor diesem Hindergrund betrachtet, bewusst zum Opfer gemacht. Sie wurden bewusst aus dem ethischen und gesetzlichen Rahmen gewaltsam hinausbefördert.

Anders verhält sich die Situation der nichtmenschlichen Tiere in ihrer Rolle im Rahmen der spezisitischen und homozentrischen menschlichen Beurteilung. Wie schon gesagt gilt die Körperverletzung nichtmenschlicher Tiere nicht oder kaum als „Verletzung“, da die ethische Klassifizierung nichtmenschlicher Tiere, deren Leidenskapazitäten und damut auch deren Würde, bislang nicht mit im Rahmen der Verpflichtungen ethischen Sozialverhaltens ansiedelt. Wobei wir es hierbei tatsächlich mit einem neuen Komplex der Ethik zu tun hätten, dem Interspezies-Sozialverhalten. (2)

Die ganze anthropologische Konstellation einer homozentrisch ausgerichteten Welt, muss in ihrer Konkretheit untersucht und überdacht werden. Analogsetzungen reichen nicht, um hier zu einer ethisch-moralischen Lösung zu gelangen. Wegen der konkreten Beschaffenheit, aus der sich die diskriminatorische Haltung gegenüber der autonomen Bedeutung nichtmenschlicher Tiere zusammensetzt – aus dem Grund der ganz speziellen Form von Gewalt in diesem Fall – kann man keine ausreichende Analogie festmachen, um Ursachen besser verstehen zu können und diese Art der Manifetation von Gewalt (eben der gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere) zu bekämpfen. Damit bleibt aber auch der Genozid am Menschen ein vorwiegend gesondert zu behandelndes Phänomen.

Ausschließlich der Vergleich der Gewaltbereitschaft beim Menschen lässt Parallelen in den Täterpsychologien entdecken. Das hat mit dem jeweiligen Opfer aber nicht unmittelbar etwas zu tun. Warum „jemand“ zum Opfer wird, hängt mit schwer zu ergründenden psychologischen Ursachen auf Seiten des Täters zusammen. Wenn, als stereotypes Beispiel, ein betrunkener Mann einen anderen im Affekt wegen einer banalen Streitigkeit tötschlägt oder eine Frau Opfer einer Vergewaltigung wird, liegt in beiden Fällen zum einen der Aspekt der Gewaltbereitschaft des Täters vor, zum anderen aber wird ein Opfer aus völlig verschiedenen Motivationen heraus gewählt. Oder: als „Hexen“ im Mittelalter als solche klassifiziert und gefoltert wurden, lag eine andere Motivation zugrunde als bei Folterungen im islamischen Gewaltregime des Iran oder wiederum bei den Folterungen Oppositioneller in der Militätdiktatur Pinochets in Chile.

Der Umstand dessen, Opfer geworden zu sein, also des Verletztwordenseins des Opfers in seiner Würde als menschliches Individuum selbst, hat niemals Rechnung für die Tätermotivation zu tragen. Man kann die Gewaltmotivation nicht hauptsächlich über die Position oder Eigenschaften des Opfers ableiten, da das Opfer nur im indirekten Zusammenhang in ein Gewaltvergehen und in die Gewalt generell eingebunden wird. (Dabei sollte man nicht vergessen: es gibt keine ethische Grundsatzlegitimierung zur Gewalt, außer derer der Selbstverteidigung oder des Schutzes. Am deutlichsten ist die indirekte Einbindung eines Opfers in der Anwendung von Gewaltmitteln zur Erzielung politischer, ideologischer oder religiöser Macht.)

Ebenso würde man keinen direkten Vergleich zwischen der Strategie z.B. der Hexenprozesse zu der Struktur der Nazigewalt gegen ihre Opfer ziehen, weil die Komplexität der Formen von Gewaltbereitschaft in den spezifischen Fällen anders erklärt werden müssen.

Die Frage der Ursachen, der Psychologie des Täters und die Fragen der Gewaltstruktur sind maßgeblich für die Erklärung über die Motivation von Gewalt und ihrer Formation. Das einzige was eine generelle Schnittmenge darstellt, zwischen allen Formen der Gewalt, ist die Gewalt selbst.

Gewalt hat Ursachen und Folgen. Die Folgen müssen in einem differenzierten Verhältnis zu den Ursachen analysiert werden, da die Ursachen oft allein dem Täter (besonders auffallend im Fall von Persönlichkeitsstörungen (3)) oder einer Tätergruppe zugeordnet werden können, und die Folgen aber die konkrete (von Täter gewollte) Einbindung des Opfers in die Gewaltpsychologie des Täters anbelangen.

Das was nun die menschliche Gesellschaft nichtmenschlichen Tieren gewaltsam antut, braucht einen eigenen Begriff der dem Sachverhalt gerecht wird. Die Bezeichnung „Holocaust“ sollte als Bezeichnung klar umrissen bleiben: Das Wort an sich bezeichnete in religiösen oder rituellen Kontexten die überbleibende Asche oder vollständige Verbrennung eines Tieropfers! Das Wort hat heute die uns allen bekannte Bedeutung im Bezug auf den Menschenmord, vor allem an den Juden durch die Nationalsozialisten im Dritten Reich. Man hat bezüglich der Gefahr von Atomwaffen und den Abwurf der Atombombe auf Hiroshima auch von einem ‚nuclear holocaust’ gesprochen, und das Englische ‚holocaust’ wurde im angelsächsischen Sprachgebrauch häufig als Synonym für den Begriff Genozid – den Massenmord an Menschen durch Menschen – angewendet.
Es ist zweifelhaft ob es irgendeinen Sinn in der Sache der Tierrechte oder der Menschenrechte macht, eine Analogie durch den Begriff des „Holokaust“ aufzeigen zu wollen. Denn dieser Versuch der Gleichsetzung trägt weder zu einer weitergreifenden Erfassung der Problematik nichtmenschlicher Tiere in einer homozentrischen Welt bei, noch kann er wirklich die Ursache von Greueltaten die Menschen an Menschen begehen oder begangen haben klären.

Ich glaube, dass solange keine Übereinkunft in der Bezeichnung des Komplexes menschlicher Gewalt gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere besteht, man begrifflich weiterkommen könnte, indem man die Unbeschrieblichkeit und die Unfassbarkeit erstmal bestehen lässt. Man hat für das, was wir heute „Tiertötung“ und „Tiermord“ nennen, noch keinen ausreichenden Begriffsrahmen geschaffen und damit auch keinen eigenen umschreibenden Begriff zur Hand.

Abschließend: Es geht in diesem Text nicht darum, durch die Aufwertung oder vielleicht eher anders Bewertung der Tierproblematik, die Würde des Menschen in irgendeiner Weise in Frage stellen zu wollen. Sondern es geht darum, dass dem Problem der Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren in seinem eigenen Recht Aufmerksamkeit erteilt werden muss.

(1) Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia, New York: Basic Books, 1974, S. 36.
(2) Dieser Punkt würde so etwas wie ein Interspezies-Sozialverhalten anbelangen, das aber abgesehen von einigen wenigen Beispielen in der Tierrechtsliteratur bislang wenig Interesse gefunden hat.
(3) In Großbritannien führten Diskussion über die psychologische oder kriminelle Einstufung von ‚personality disorders’ vor forensischem Hintergrund zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Einstufung nicht-therapierbarer Persönlichkeitsstörungen für die Rechtsprechung ein nicht klar addressierbarer Problemfall bleibt.

Das Acrylbild oben stammt von Farangis Yegane http://crownofthecreation.farangis.de/birds.one. Dieser Text wurde von Gita Yegane Arani-May verfasst und ist im Veganswines Reader 08 erschienen.

Dieser Text als PDF (öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

From: Elias Canetti, Crowds and Power, The Entrails of Power …

Eating, crushing, as a form of wielding power over other living beings … Elias Canetti in ‘Crowds and Power’ pp. 210-211:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/79014916/Canetti-Crowds-and-Power (link open in new window)

I don’t agree with much of Canetti’s view on nonhuman animal behaviour in this nevertheless excellent piece of work of his. However, these thoughts about the ingestion of flesh as an act of wielding power over another animals life, are unique.

Another of his thoughts about human domination over nonhuman animals in the same publication is noteworthy too:

The Entrails of Power: ‘ …But even more than fear or rage, it is contempt which urges him to crush it. An insect, something so small that it scarcely counts, is crushed because one would not otherwise know what had happened to it; no human hand can form a hollow small enough for it. But, in addition to the desire to get rid of a pest and to be sure it is really disposed of, our behaviour to a gnat or a flea betrays the contempt we feel for a being which is utterly defenseless, which exists in a completely different order of size and power from us, with which we have nothing in common, into which we never transform ourselves and which we never fear except when it suddenly appears in crowds. The destruction of these tiny creatures is the only act of violence which remains unpunished even within us. Their blood does not stain our hands, for it does not remind us of our own. We never look into their glazing eyes. We do not eat them. They have never – at least not amongst us in the West – had the benefit of our growing, if not yet very effective, concern for life. In brief, they are outlaws. If I say to someone, ‘I could crush you with one hand,’ I am expressing the greatest possible contempt. It is as though I were saying: ‘You are an insect. You mean nothing to me. I can do what I like with you and that won’t mean anything to me either. You mean nothing to anyone. You can be destroyed with impunity without anyone noticing. It would make no difference to anyone. Certainly not to me.’

Mitfühlen oder die Frage nach dem Bösen

 

Im Zugen der Frage danach, ob man mit den Menschen, die Tiere töten oder töten möchten, oder meinen töten zu „müssen“, ob man mit diesen Menschen „mitfühlen“ sollte, sollte man sich aber auch fragen, warum soll ich hier nicht von einer „bösen“ Motivation sprechen. Warum soll ich Verständnis für etwas aufbringen, das auch mein Verständnis nicht zu einem Recht werden ließe.

Ich habe in letzter Zeit häufiger gelesen, dass man doch bitte Verständnis haben solle, mit denen, die Tiere wegen ihres „Fleisches“ oder ihrer „Nutzbarkeit“ töten (wollen). Das habe ich aber nicht im speziellen von Speziesisten gehört, sondern von Leuten, die Blogs über Tierrechte betreiben.

Die Frage nach dem „Bösen“ im Speziesismus ist also, und das mag überraschen, gar nicht eine, die so selbstverständlich gestellt wird. Man verurteilt zwar die Tiertötung und die Gewalt gegen Tiere, aber man diskutiert und analysiert nicht, warum die Tiertötung – von Seiten dessen, der sie begeht oder in Auftrag gibt –, nicht als eine so schwerwiegende Tat wie Mord klassifiziert werden kann ( – aus Gründen des Selbstschutzes natürlich, der scheinmoralischen Legitimation). Und das noch nicht mal von vielen Tierrechtlern.

Eine speziesistische Handlung ist sich dessen bewusst tierverachtend zu sein, aber das spezielle, an dieser Form der Diskriminierung gegen ein anderes Lebewesen ist, dass man es hier mit einer Diskriminierungsform zu tun hat, die einerseits „böse“ motiviert ist – sie will dem Opfer schaden – aber andererseits schafft diese Form der Oppression sich einen Freibrief, indem sie die Gravität ihrer Gewalt als Nichtigkeit verhüllt.

Wenn nun aber auch gerade noch die, die eigentlich gegen diese Form der Gewalt vorgehen wollen, denken, man müsse den Tätern, den spezisitsich handelnden, begegnen, indem man ihnen mit Verständis und Mitfühlsamkeit einen Raum der Legitimität schafft, dann erreicht der Speziesismus genau das was er will: er gibt sich als eine wertneutrale Realität menschlichen Denkens aus, und nicht als Verstoß gegen ein ursächliches Moralempfinden, das die Aufgaben hat, Recht zu schützen, zu verteidigen und überhaupt ethische Schutzräume zu postulieren.

Was ist los mit PETA? PETA und der Vorwurf der unnötigen Tiereuthanasie

Gita Yegane Arani-May

Was ist los mit PETA?

PETA und der Vorwurf der unnötigen Tiereuthanasie

Dieser Text als PDF (Link öffnet sich in einem neuem Fenster)

Die „People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)“USAhaben im Jahr 2011:

760 Hunde ihn Ihre „Obhut“ aufgenommen. Von diesen 760 haben sie 713 getötet, durch Euthanasie (Einschläferung), weil Sie meinten die Hunde nicht vermitteln zu können. 19 der Hunde wurden an neue „Herrchen/Frauchen“ vermittelt, 36 wurden an „Kill Shelters“ weitergegeben. „Kill Shelters“ sind die Tierheime in den USA, in denen Tiere eingeschläfert werden, wenn sie innerhalb einer zeitlichen Frist (oft nur 24 Stunden) nicht zu vermitteln sind. Die Schicksale der 36 überlebenden oder übrig gebliebenen Hunde konnte auch auf Nachfrage nicht mehr weiter verfolgt werden.

Und im Jahr 2011 nahmen PETA 1.211 Katzen in ihre vermeintlich tierschützerische Obhut: 1.198 dieser Katzen wurden eingeschläfert. 5 wurden an ein neues Zuhause vermittelt und 3 an „Kill Shelter“ weitergereicht (auch deren weiterer Schicksalsverlauf konnte nicht in Erfahrung gebracht werden).

Auch wurden 58 andere Haustiere von PETA in Jahr 2011 „aufgenommen“. Dazu gehörten auch Kaninchen und 54 dieser Tiere wurden eingeschläfert. Nur 4 wurden vermittelt.

So wurden im Jahr 2011 insgesamt also 2.029 Haustiere durch PETA „aufgenommen“, von denen 1.965 eingeschläfert wurden. Nur 28 dieser Tiere wurden an neue „Herrchen/Frauchen“ weitervermittelt.

Die zahlen Stammen von den offiziellen Angaben die der No Kill Advocacy Center bei den zuständigen Behörden in Virginia einholte:

http://www.nathanwinograd.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/PETA.2011.pdf (letzter Zugriff vom 31.10.12).

Das sind erschütternde Zahlen. 97% der Tiere, die durch PETA aufgenommen wurden, wurden von PETA eingeschläfert. Wenn nun auch noch dazukäme, dass die Tiere, die PETA an „Kill Shelter“ weitergegeben hat, dort auch getötet wurden oder man dort zuvor untergebrachte Tiere getötet hat um die von PETA gebrachten aufzunehmen, dann kann die Tötungsrate sogar bei 99% liegen (das wären dann 2.009 der 2.029 durch PETA aufgenommenen Tiere). Zumindest eins ist klar, dass nur 1% der Tiere erfolgreich an ein neues Zuhause vermittelt wurde.

All dies geschah, während die „No Kill“ Bewegung in den USA – die ihre Aufgabe dain sieht, zu verhindern und zu vermeiden, dass Tiere in Tierheimen eingeschläfert werden –, bahnbrechende Erfolge bei der Vermittlung von Tieren und im Tierheim-Management erzielt hat. Sogenannte „No Kill“-Gemeinschaften gibt es inzwischen überall in den Vereinigten Staaten, so z.B. in Kalifornien, Nevada, Michigan, Kentucky, New York, Texas, Virginia, aber auch in weiteren Bundesstaaten. Warum also setzen PETA ihre Pro-Euthanasie Agenda weiter fort, statt sich um eine Reform des Tierheimsystems in den USA zu kümmern?

Genau diese Frage stellt sich der vegane Tierrechtsaktivist Nathan Winograd. Er steht in der vordersten Front im Kampf gegen die unnötige massenhafte Tiertötung, die im Großteil US amerikanischer Tierheime stattfindet. Im Jahr 2004 hat Winograd den ‚No Kill Advocacy Center’ gegründet, und er bemüht sich seitdem um eine umfassende Reformierung des Tierheimsystems in den USA. Ihm geht es dabei um die vollständige Beendigung der systematischen Tötung von Tieren in den noch überwiegend existierenden „traditionell“ betriebenen Tierheimen, in denen das Töten von Tieren aus Platzgründen und innerhalb kürzester Fristen schierer Alltag ist.

Ersetzen will Winograd das antiquierte Modell der Tierheimführung mit einer Methode, die er in einer ‚No Kill Equation’ beschreibt. Die nötigen Informationen, die den Tierheimen dabei helfen können, diesen Reformierungschritt zu tun, stellt der ‚No Kill Advocacy Center’ Interessierten Tierschützern und Tierheimbetreibern zum Download im Internet zur Verfügung: http://www.nokilladvocacycenter.org/shelter-reform/toolkit/ (letzter Zugriff vom 4.11.12).

Insbesondere aber steht Nathan Winograd im Konflikt mit der Tierschutzorganisation PETA, eben wegen der oben genannten Zahlen, wegen der Tierschicksale, die sich hinter solchen statistischen Angaben verbergen. Vor Jahren bereits kritisierte Winograd, dass PETA fast jedes Tier, dass durch sie aufgenommen wird, und in deren Kontrolle gerät, einschläfert. Inzwischen ist Nathan Winograd zu der Überzeugung gekommen, dass er den Fall PETA nicht mit den anderen Organisationen, Vereinen und Tierheimbetreibern mehr vergleichen kann, mit denen er sonst konfrontiert ist, im grausamen Tiertötungsystem amerikanischer Tierheime. Winograd glaubt, dass die charismatische Gründerin und Direktorin von PETA, Ingrid Newkirk „dunkle Impulse“ haben müsse, um so eine Strategie zu fahren.

Schon vorher im Jahr 2006 betrug PETAs Tötungsrate, der durch sie aufgenommenen Tiere 97%. Trotz der Millionen von tierliebenden Mitgliedern, einem weltweiten Netzwerk und einem Budget in zweistelliger Millionenhöhe, soll es PETA nicht möglich sein, dass zu vollbringen, was der nun wachsenden ‚No Kill’ Gemeinschaft mit weitaus weniger Mitteln gelingt?

Als Winograd im Jahr 2006 die genauen Zahlen, der durch PETA getöteten Tiere auf seinem Blog veröffentliche, und deren Praxis damit öffentlich anprangerte, erhielt er von PETAs Anwälten eine Drohung, man wolle ihn wegen Defamation anzeigen. Kein Wunder, die Zahlen vermitteln einem eine konkrete Vorstellung über das Ausmaß eines fehlgeleiteten Ehrgeizes in Sachen Tierheim- und Tierpopulationsmanagement: im Jahr 2006 wurden 1.942 von 1.960 Katzen von PETA eingeschläfert, 988 von 1.030 Hunden und 50 von 52 Kaninchen, Meerschweinchen und anderen Kleintieren. Und schließlich auch ein Huhn, das einzige, das PETA 2006 in ihre „Obhut“ genommen hatte; auch dieses Tier wurde von PETA eingeschläfert.

Im Jahr 2007 lag die Tötungsrate bei 91% der durch sie aufgenommenen Tiere. Konkret waren das 1.815 von 1.997 Tieren. In den folgenden Jahren, in denen Winograd immer wieder die Zahlen veröffentliche, lag der jährliche Durchschnitt der Tötungsrate bei erschreckenden 96%. Im Jahr 2008 wurden nur sieben Hunde und Katzen an ein neues Zuhause weitervermittelt. Nur 34 Tiere wurden an weitere Tierheime (u.z. der American Society for the Protection of Animals) weitergegeben, deren Schicksal bis dato aber auch unbekannt geblieben ist. 2008 waren diese 34 Tiere die einzigen Haustiere, die in dieses System geraten sind, die PETA wirklich „gerettet“ hat. Sie töteten von im Jahr 2008 aufgenommenen 2.216 Tieren: 555 von 584 Hunde und 1.569 von 15.89 Katzen.

Im Jahr 2009 fanden nur 8 Adoptionen statt, weniger als ein Prozent der durch PETA aufgenommenen Tiere. 2.301 von 2.366 Tieren wurden von ihnen eingeschläfert. 2010 tötete man 1.507 von 1.553 Katzen und 693 von 792 Hunden. Und das Jahr 2011 haben wir bereits oben erwähnt: eine Tötungsrate von 97%: 1.965 der 2.029 Tiere, die durch PETA aufgenommen wurden, wurden von PETA unnötig getötet.

Zusammenfassend heißt das, dass die Tierschutzorganisation PETA in den letzten 15 Jahren mehr als 25.000 Tiere getötet haben. Das sind etwa 2.500 Tiere pro Jahr. PETA töteten in den letzen Jahren tatsächlich fünf Tiere pro Tag. Mit sicherheit hätten sie das verhinden können.

Die Organisation PETA argumentiert, dass man „nur“ die Tiere einschläfere, die „nicht vermittelbar“ seien. PETAs Anwalt äußerte das gegenüber Nathan Winograd, in seiner Drohung mit einer Anzeige wegen Defamation. Diese Behauptung aber, sagt Winograd, sei unwahr. Die Dokumente, die Winograd für seine Recherchen vom Staate Virginia einholte, sind die öffentlich registrierten Angaben über die Tiere, die aufgenommen wurden, und zwar vermeintlich „zum Zwecke der Adoption“. PETA legt sich überhaupt nicht fest oder gibt bekannt, was genau ihre Kriterien sind, nach denen sie beurteilen, ob ein Tier adoptierbar bzw. vermittelbar ist oder nicht.

Rettungsgruppen und Einzelpersonen haben inzwischen auch öffentlich angegeben, dass sie PETA durchaus gesunde und vermittelbare Tiere übergeben haben. Ein Veterinär legte unter Eid vor Gericht die Aussage ab, dass PETA gesunde Tiere übergeben wurden, die man bei ihnen später tot gefunden habe, deren Körper PETA ganz unspektakulär in den Müllcontainern eines Supermarktes zu entsorgen versucht hätte. Eine Tageszeitung, der Daily Caller, berichtete in dem Zusammenhang auch, dass zwei Angestellte von PETA meinten, dass einige der von ihnen eingeschläferten Hunde und Katzen „ganz niedlich“ und eigentlich „perfekt“ gewesen wären. Sie töteten diese Tiere aber, in einem von PETAs Kleintransportern.

Ingrid Newkirk selbst, die Ikone und Chefin von PETA, antwortete in einem Interview das George Stroumboulopoulos von der Canadian Broadcasting Company am 2 Dezember 2008 mit ihr führte, auf die Frage: „Schläfern sie auch die vermittelbaren Tiere ein, wenn sie sie bekommen?“ Newkirk: „Wenn wir sie bekommen, und wenn wir für sie kein Zuhause finden können, absolut.“ Newkirk gab öffentlich zu, dass PETA „absolut“ keine Bedenken dabei habe, Tiere zu töten, die eigentlich auch gerettet werden könnten – würde man einen anderen Ansatz im Tierschutz wählen und würde man die ‚No Kill’ Gemeinschaften als eine Alternative und als wegweisende Modelle akzeptieren.

„Warum akzeptiert die Tierschutzbewegung in den USA Ingrid Newkirk überhaupt?“ fragt Winograd zu Recht. „Keine andere Bewegung würde so jemanden in einer Schlüsselposition belassen, ohne dass es zur öffentlichen Empörung käme, wenn Aktionen so gegen die fundamentalen Werte gehen, denen man sich ja eigentlich mal verschrieben hat.“ In keinem Zweig der Menschnrechtsbewegung würde man schließlich einen Mörder beherbergen wollen, aber in der Tierrechtsbewegung, die sich auf dem Gedanken begründet, dass Tiere ein Recht haben zu leben, in dieser Bewegung toleriert man eine Tiermörderin als Chefin und Leitfigur solch einer großen Organisation. Newkirk gibt das ganz öffentlich zu, was es eigentlich überhaupt nich geben dürfte. Und tatsächlich scheint der Rest der US amerikanischen Tierrechts- und Tierschutzgruppen fast ausmahmslos, trotz zahlreicher offener Kritikpunkte gegen die PETA, in diesem Punkt aber bevorzugt zu schweigen.

Was der Sache nicht hilft, und einer defensiven Haltung in der Tierrechts- und Tierschutzbewegung zuspielt, ist außerdem eine Kampagne einer pro-kommerziellen Lobbysistengruppe des ‚Center for Consumer Freedom’. Diese Organisation hat eine Seite ins Netz gestellt, mit dem Titel „PETA kills animals“: http://www.petakillsanimals.com/ (letzter Zugriff vom 4.11.12). Und genau wegen dieser Seite können PETA von dem Eindruck profitieren, dass nur Gegner des Tierschutzes und der Tierrechte ein Interesse daran haben könnte, PETA anzugreifen. Da PETA eine so große und immerhin noch populäre Organisation sind, werden sie stellvertretend für ein „irrationales Verhalten“ der modernen Tierschutz- und Tierrechtsbewegung an den Pranger gestellt. In dem Punkt der Euthanasie mag der ‚Center for Consumer Freedom’ allerdings recht haben.

PETA selbst betreibt eine Kampagne zur Aufklärung gegen „No Kill Shelters“ und behaupten ihr Standpunkt sei „Tierrecht ohne Kompromisse“: http://www.peta.org/about/why-peta/no-kill-shelters.aspx (letzer Zugriff vom 4.11.12). Sie schließen die Vermittlung und Übergabe an Tierheime die nicht töten kategorisch aus, mit zahlreichen Begründungen, wovon einige in diesem Artikel aus Nathan Winograds Perspektive Beschrieben sind:

PETAs gute kleine Soldaten http://simorgh.de/niceswine/peta_und_tiereuthanasie.

Ingrid Newkirk wird in der Tierschutz- und Tierrechtsbewegung hofiert und als Stargast empfangen, wie auf der jährlichen großen Tierrechtskonferenz in Washington. Besonders aber die größte Tierschutzorganisation in den USA, die Humane Society, pflegt mit Newkirk eine besonders enge Beziehung. Denn auch diese Organisation betreibt eine Politik ihm Tierheimmanagement, indem die Euthanasie ein unumstrittener Besantndteil des Umgangs mit den unerwünschten oder entlaufenen Haustieren ist.

Winograd schildert auf seiner Webseite, dass Ingrid Newkird früher einmal in der Washingtoner Humane Society arbeitete und dort auch selbst Tiere einschläferte. Das Tierheim in dem sie tätig war hätte einen schlechten Ruf gehabt, es wäre eines gewesen, wo man auf die Einschläferung als Mittel zur Organisation des Heimes eher zurückgriff, als auf die Möglichkeit ein Tier zu retten. Und Wingorad gräbt noch tiefer in der Biografie Newkirks, um nach einer Antwort zu suchen, die ihre Einstellung zur Tötung (statt Reformierung) als Lösung erklären könnte.

Man könne ja schließlich nicht einfach sagen, dass PETA in allen Punkten hypokritisch sind, oder dass ihnen einzelne Tiere kategorisch egal wären. Befürworter der „No Kill“-Bewegung würden dies zwar der Praxis und der Haltung PETAs im Bezug auf die Frage des Umgangs mit heimatlosen, entlaufenen / gefundenen Tieren und Tieren in Tierheimen zu Rechtens attestieren, aber eine komplette Erklärung für PETAs widersprüchliche Politik als Tierschutzorganisation kann man bislang nicht finden.

Auch wäre da noch der Unterschied zur Humane Society USA, die zwar auch die eine Logistik des Tiere-Einschläferns in den Tierheimen als Praxis verfolgt, und dadurch ebenfalls im Vizier der „No Kill“-Bewegung und besorgter Tierschützer steht. Doch bei der Humane Society ist der Faktor von Opportunismus noch sichtbar; die Humane Society richtet ihren Blick in erster Linie auf ihre Geldgeber und Förderer. Bei PETA aber scheint sich da noch etwas anderes abzuspielen. Etwas das abgründiger und undurchsichtiger erscheint.

Newkirk, so schreibt Winograd, schottet sich gegen Kritik ab, indem sie eine Spache der Opposition zur „No Kill“-Bewegung entworfen hat. PETA selbst verfügt über keinerlei Verträge in irgendwelchen Bundesstaaten, die ihnen eine Zuständigkeit für die Populationskontrolle und den munizipalen Tierschutz zuweisen würde. Auch arbeiten PETA nicht offiziell als eine „rescue group“ (Rettungsgruppe).

Jeder Vorschlag, der PETA gemacht wird, nach lebensrettenden Alternativen zu schaunen, sie zuminderst zu berückstichtigen, wird abgetan als Ahnlungslosigkeit und Naivität, die „No Kill“ Gemeinden würden, so behaupten PETA, die Tiere nicht mehr als wie Ware in Lagern stapeln. PETA nennen das „animal warehousing“. Mit so einem Begriff, lassen sich die schlimmsten Assoziationen in das geistige Auge des Durchschnitttierschützers zaubern.

Wenn von innen, d.h. von Mitarbeitern PETAs selbst Kritik oder Zweifel an den Vorgehensweisen geäußert wird, müssen diese damit rechnen, dass sie das den Job kosten wird, und dass man sie menschlich durch einen Ausschluss aus der Gruppe abstrafen wird.

In einem Gespräch, das Winograd mit einem Ex-Mitarbeiter von PETA geführt hat, gab dieser an, er hätte sich ein Video anschauen müssen, in dem die „No Kill“ Praxis als eine Form von Tierhortung – dem pathologischen Zwang, Tiere zu horten – dargestellt wurde. Dieser Mitarbeiter hätte zu der Zeit, in den 1990ern, in San Francisco gelebt, als die „No Kill“-Bewegung dort gerade ihre größte Erfolge verbuchte, und er habe nachgefragt, ob das was das Video zeige, Realität wäre. Darauf hin wurde ihm gekündigt.

 

Aus dem Vegan*Swines Reader IV (2012): Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Diese Informationen basiert auf Erfahrungswerten von Tierrettungs- bzw. schutzhöfen und den Recherchen bekannter Tierrechts- bzw. schutzorganisationen. Die Angaben beziehen sich auf die Realität in westeuropäischen und US-amerikanischen Agrarbetrieben.

Eine „humane“ Umgehensweise sollte eigentlich bedeuten, mit Respekt und Einfühlungsvermögen mit den Lebewesen umzugehen, die auf unsere Hilfe angewiesen sind. Es ist egal, ob es dabei um Menschen oder um Tiere geht. Das, was wir genau unter „humanen“, also menschlichen Werten verstehen, läßt darauf zurückschließen, auf welchem Level sich der gegenwärtige Aufgeklärtheitsstatus unserer Kultur befindet.

Würden wir die gleichen Methoden, die wir in der Aufzucht, Versorgung, und Tötung von Farmtieren praktizieren, auf unsere Haustiere anwenden, dann wäre das gesetzeswidrig und jeder normale Mensch würde so eine Behandlungsweise von Tieren als erschreckend und grausam empfinden … diesen Text als PDF lesen / downloaden (Link öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)