An individual’s narrative – Animal Autonomy

Every individual animal has a narrative (in context with her experience of her habitat and environment).

Denying nonhuman animals their own languages, as autonomous communicative systems that linguistically have evolved independent of human linguistics, means denying animals moral agency, let alone the experience of an individual narrative.

Biologism and epistemological humancentrism reduce nonhuman animals to mere ‘explicable organisms’.

TIERAUTONOMIE / GRUPPE MESSEL

Mitgefühl als bedingter Gerechtigkeitsaspekt

Überlegung zu: Pazifismus

Zum Schutz von Leben hat Mitgefühl erst dann einen effektiven Sinn, wenn die Gerechtigkeit als Inhalt und Ziel dabei nicht aus den Augen verloren wird.

(HUMANITY) Im rechtlich durch Menschenrechtskonventionen abgesichterten Bereich, braucht das sensible Gleichgewicht des „Friedens“ eine gewisse Absicherung durch Maßnahmen, die „schützende Gewalt“ nicht immer und nicht gänzlich ausschließen.

(ANIMALITY) Im Falle oppressiver Gewalt gegen Nichtmenschen erwarten wir von Menschen die Freiwilligkeit und appellieren an das Mitgefühl, weil wir die Nichtmenschen in einer speziesistischen Gesellschaft und Welt gegenwärtig auf keiner gesellschaftlich und politisch konstituierten rechtlichen Grundlage schützen können.

Mitgefühl allein reicht in der Konfrontation mit nakter Gewalt aber in keiner Form aus.

Die einzige Grundlage, die eine Chance auf das Recht des Schutzes vor Gewalt (systemischer oder individueller Natur) bietet, ist die grundlegende Einforderung von Gerechtigkeit.

(Pazifismus im Kontext mit‚Humanity’ und ‚Animality’ als politisch definitorische Bereiche.)

TIERAUTONOMIE / Gruppe Messel

What is Animality, and what it isn’t

You are at risk of engaging in rhetorical branding if:

… ANIMALITY equals:

pigeonholing nonhuman animal otherness in (philosophical, religious, scientific, biologistic, aesthetic, anthropologic) terms of excluding zoopolitical spaces of animal autonomy.

… and if HUMANITY amounts to:

“we”, the “Homo sapiens”.

A new discourse needs fresh approaches – not just a new labelling system for an ongoing current of stable fallacies.

 

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists.

From a recent discussion / Gruppe Messel

This Text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Two debates, the same problem with speciesist rhetorics blurring out a reasonable, coherent discourse.

A.)   The (unfortunately) highly controversial debate about Halal and Kosher slaughter methods.

B.)   The ‘humane meat’ marketing campaigns, using Animal Welfare as the as a vehicle for their sales boosting.

In both these speciesist segments – the one religious, the other one more plain-culturally based – you face an upholding of speciesist ideological tenets, additionally to the front-fight of defending a speciesist practice.

Why are we discussing these two examples of speciesist praxes?

Pro-arguments defending these two praxes, that are finding their basis in cultural reception, have permeated the AR debate to some extent on outreach strategies in regards to multiculturalism and culture – assuming “traditions” to be fixed societal phenomena/entities, immune to continuous ethical historical change.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of A.):

The basic argument from an AR side defending religious slaughter methods, as no less “cruel” than pre-stun methods, goes that Nonhumans suffer either way, conditions in slaughterhouses might even be worse, at least as bad, and that all slaughter must stop.

Usually missed in this string of argumentation is a more detailed critique why e.g. slaughterhouses such as those designed by Temple Grandin are for example “as bad” as religious slaughter methods: So called “humane” slaughter methods have to be criticized and critically examined in their own respect.

The argument against the relativization of ‘different speciesist practices’ as in the case A.) from an AR position can be:

Why are we fighting to be able to film abuse in factory farms, when in the end of the day the comparably more abusive form of “handling” does not make any difference at all? After all we are always trying to alleviate any comparably more “extreme” forms of suffering in a situation where we can’t stop speciesism overnight. We do that, alongside with campaigning for veganism!

The trap with religious animal killing practices is that the degree to which killing becomes a deed of “good” is mostly being overlooked let alone critically discussed. Can you really expect strict believers to end killing Nonhumans, if it’s on behalf of an “almighty God” who decrees you to do so?

From an AR point of view we would say that no religion/religious tradition/belief whatsoever must come before either Animal Rights or Human Rights, equally.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of B.):

Anecdotal example: A German animal advocacy group advertises for “humane meat” with the slogan: “For a life before becoming meat” (http://www.provieh.de/downloads_provieh/01_ki_schweine.pdf, 5/11/14), the same slogan is being used by the Austrian Green Party (http://www.gruene.at/europa/2-welle,5/11/14).

The problem being that cultural tenets of speciesism are not questioned, nor what strategies are effective at what given context. Strategies and analyses seem to fall short to a short-term mass-movement idea and behaviour within the AR community.

– There is no clear line drawn towards the impacts of what comes along as cultural heritage.

– Activists fight against the symptoms, not the cultural roots of speciesist rethorics that enables speciesist practices to be culturally active.

On one hand “humane slaughter” advocacy has moved “down”, in terms of Animal Advocacy ideals, to some of the “stricter” Animal Welfare organizations, like the CIWF with for example their recent campaign “Better-Chicken.org”: it seems that such welfarist pro “humane meat” campaigns throw the baby out of with the bathwater, since instead of trying to seek alleviating suffering with the goal of ending speciesism overall as a target, they are of course prolonging speciesist culture.

However, AR advocates who do distance themselves from such campaigns, seem to fail to address (analytically and strategically) how important it is to target the functionality of speciesism and its rhetoric in the plain culturally-based sense.

– AR places its critique more at the sociological and the psychological level, not as much on the anthropological and cultural level, and when at least not with a distanced view.

– A question would be e.g.: How does the argument “I only buy organic humanely slaughtered meat” set in? Why is it accepted in society seen from a cultural / anthropological critical perspective?

This type of question has to be contextualized with how a culture works, and how the individual takes a role within this cultural setting for example.

 

Animal Thealogy: Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (Part 1)


Vulnerable by Farangis Yegane

Animal Thealogy:

Man-Machine? Animal Reason! (Part 1)

Palang LY

The basic question about the categorical division into (nonhuman) “animals” and “humans” (Homo sapiens), brings up probably before the question of its moral implications, the question about what exactly hides beneath both these big generalized identities.

Why has the view about that what-animals-are and that what-humans-are finally lead to us only viewing animals under biological terms today?

Is it enough to attribute only an instinctual behaviour to nonhuman animals?

Is it thus the ‘fault’ of animals that humans won’t relate to them in any further way than how they are relating to them today?

What other options are there?

Animal = instinctual? Human = reasoning? Attributed identities in a human-centered narrative

If we don’t accept the view that nonhuman animals are those who have to stand below humans, within a frame given by e.g. a biological, philosophical or even divine hierarchy-of-being, then such a claim doesn’t have to be solely morally motivated. It can also mean that we question the way in which both identities („animal“ and „human“) are understood, that we question the separation and qualifications of these identities, even before the questions of our wrongdoings enter the floor of debate.

We can ask if the interpretation of the characteristics that are considered to make up the marking dividers within a human-animal hierarchy, are in reality a negation of the autonomous value of otherness in nonhuman animals.

We know that the single criterion that serves as our standard, is the human parameter, i.e. the human model counts as the ideal, as the standard, for creating norms.

So what happens if we put this standard of measurement into doubt?

It’s a question of perspective!

Conclusions deduced in the fields of biology and psychology, with those being the main academic sectors that deal with the explicability of animal identity, nail the perspectives:

  1. on relevant characteristics
  2. on how animal characteristics (in either, the case of humans or nonhuman animals) have to a.) express themselves and b.) in which exact correlation they have to become „measurable“, in order to reach a certain relevance or meaningfulness from a human point of perspective.

So the problem lies in the question why humans won’t accept nonhuman animal autonomy when it can’t be made fathomable through the perception of a value-defined comparison.

Why are own animal criterions and why is their independent meaningfulness (for the sake of themselves and for their situation within their natural and social inter- and co-specific contexts) rendered irrelevant, when they cross our perspectivical glance, and when these animal criteria could also be understood and accepted to fully lay outside of our hierarchical-framework?

Animal individuality

To be willing to accept an autonomous meaningfulness of nonhuman animals, means to question the deindividualization, that our views and explanations about nonhuman animals purport.

Those are the views that allow us to set nonhuman animals in comparison to us, as ‘the human group’ of identity, instead of seeing otherness in itself as a full value. And those are also the views that seek to sort out how the existential ‘meaning’ of nonhuman animals might relate to anything that matters to us “humans” as a closed group of identity.

The deindividualized view of nonhuman animals almost automatically goes along with the subtraction of value in terms of attributed meaningfulness, and so we land at the moral question now, as the question of identities, individual existence and deinidivdualisation pose some ethical conflicts.

Nonhuman animals, and the attributed identities in the fields of “animal” and “human” social contexts

If we can view nonhuman animals, apart from their localization in the realm of biology, for example also in a sociological context, then we could ask the question: „How do people act towards nonhumans animals?“

Can we explain the behaviour of humans towards nonhuman animals solely by referring to the common notion that one can’t really behave in any particular way towards nonhuman animals because they are supposedly ‘instinctively set’ and ‘communicatively restricted’ compared to us, and that thus our behaviour towards them can’t contain an own quality of a social dynamic?

Can we legitimate our typically human social misbehaviour towards nonhuman animals by referring to the „stupidity“ that we interpret into nonhuman animal behaviour?

(Such questions would of course only feed themselves on stereotypes of animal identity, no matter from where they stem.)

However we probably can’t ask any of such questions a sociologist, though it could fall into their scope to analyse these relationships. Sociologists likely would prefer to deal with the Animal Rights movement and not deal with the interaction between humans and nonhuman animals, since everyone seems to be with the fact that a natural science, biology, has already determined what the identity of nonhuman animals “factually” is. And it must be said that even the Animal Rights movement seems the place moral question somewhere almost out of reach by accepting the explanation of the identity of animals as something more or less strictly biological.

End of part 1

Reaching far? Animal Thealogy – female animal deities, female human deities, on the terms of such angles.

 

Feminism, Speciesism, Anthropocentrism – and the need to rethink the sexism / speciesism analogy

Feminism, Speciesism, Anthropocentrism

Examples of female rhetorics of speciesism: Objectification of beings oppressed, animalesque figures made with wool / felt; Lesbianism and dead nonhumans and trophys as cultural heritage; Helplessness and helping as an act of public viewing, link 1, link 2; the daily randnomness of the gender / nonhuman animal speciesist contexts, women taking/being part … (all links acc. 16. July 2013)

Is a self-critical view on gender / being a woman / feminism necessary? What would speak against it? We know that in our daily lives we, as women, make decisions that touch on core grounds that turn the private / the personal into the political. As vegans we know how impactful our personal choices are, and as social beings we also know how hard it can be to draw a line between the social expectations that one tries to fit in (in order to find a job, to be liked and accepted, keep ones family together, and so forth).

Speciesism, as remote as it seems, is to be found at the same point where “my-choice-to-decide-otherwise” (or not) crosses just any implications of socialization that I feel are ethically unjustifiable. When I rant against sexism I might as well rant against an injustice that targets nonhumans, if I am a vegan anti-speciesist minded person.

Speciesism can be understood to work socially as an ideology, where people who are convinced of their degrading stance believe in a collectively held fiction that is assumed and agreed upon as objectivity, so that no rebuttal can take place on “rational grounds”.

Women do feel at home in this construct inasmuch as men do, on the large scale. Both 50 percent of humanity, male and female, believe so much in human superiority that they are willing to constitute part of a speciesist society by fulfilling their individual part in the fiction.

“Gender” defines itself from interaction within a group or society. Being oppressed as a woman doesn’t automatically mean that you can’t be oppressive towards nonhuman animals. Drawing an analogy between sexism (or genderism) and speciesism does not take account of the different reasons and histories why the victim gets oppressed in the first place – for what ends, and how exactly.

If we turn a blind eye on the gender specific functions of speciesism and anthropocentrism we might risk a loophole in our argumentation for our own rights defending nonhumans and for integral Animal Rights themselves.

Speciesism is a unique tragedy. The history of being classified as “animals” by humans, with all that entailed, as beings whose existence had been on earth aeons before humans evolved, can’t be compared to any other form of oppression by simple analogy. Being objectified as solely “animate”, being slaughterable, edible, huntable, vivisectable, being objectifiable and judged as “definable” in the first place constitutes an incomparable situation for the affected subject, and hints at a unique technique of injustice on behalf of the oppressive side that is being applied to this victimized group.

Comparisons between different forms of oppression are extensively helpless efforts.

Either we plainly name that natural sciences, religion, philosophy mass society can’t legitimately classify the beings we call “nonhuman animals”, or we stay stuck in our psychological accompliceship with the very hierarchical and oppressive “systems” we criticize so vehemently as what regards our own pains.

I don’t see an alternative.

Image  © 2013 @farangisyegane

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

Palang LY

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

There so far is no such thing as a “positive” veganic (which means: organic vegan agriculture) Animal Rights consciousness.

Not taking into consideration that nonhuman animals must be helped by all possible means, here looks to me like a form of speciesism might be lurking in the background, since if humans where in a comparable plight, anybody who would describe him-/herself as a non- misanthrope would help the humans in question.

What I am mainly interested in is:

Why doesn’t it occur to vegans and the veganic (vegan organic) movement, that humans and nonhuman animals can co-exist, can co-live without exploitation, as an option?

I have looked at various veganic projects, and as far as one can see, “animal rights” only plays a role in the way, that exploitation and usage of animals and animal products / fertilizer derived from animals is non-permitted, on ethical grounds, mainly. Hence, these people are VEGANS, and not just any people avoiding animal products: They avoid animal exploitation. That’s the Animal Rights part of the veganic movement.

But apart from that, the very nonhuman animals that we as VEGANS want to HELP, don’t come in or become visible or noticed as beings that we are willing to live together with, that we are willing to share the earth with. As if the soil and the forests were ours to use, ours to live on, ours to say what’s right to do with it (“it” … that is: nature).

Billions of animals

Of course the forceful exploitation of the reproductive system of animals has to stop. Of course any form of overpopulation is bad for anybody and this planet. But the lives, that didn’t chose to come into this world, the lives that just happen to find themselves here – we do have to ethically respect the fact that these individuals exist.

Sanctuaries and vegan farming should merge I believe! To cut a long “story” short and practical.

But back to veganic-ism as it is

There is the mention of using human manure and faeces for fertilization (apart from the much more promising sounding self-fertilizing gardening methods which exist in veganicism too of course). But if people are willing to use their own manure, as part of the biological process of vegan agriculture, can’t the idea of “the sanctuary” and the idea of a newly veganic option be created in peoples minds? People can tolerate their own manure somewhere, but not another (nonhuman) animal’s manure? I think we cannot say that it is speciesist and exploitative if both humans and nonhuman animals live together in a natural space without harming or exploiting or using each other.

We as vegans ought to LIVE together with the other animals on this planet, in a peaceful manner, in mixed communities. If we can’t develop a consciousness for that, we fail at creating a (more complete) positive ethic. It’s enormously tragic that we let the speciesist view of “animals, us and the world” win insofar, that this view manages to inspire us vegans not to willingly plan to live together with the so called farm animals in a vegan, caring manner, with a strong will to co-exist.

Are the only options we can chose from the one of degrading nonhuman animals or otherwise totally excluding them, and making them nonexistent in a (desired utopian) daily reality? No, really, because this planet is also an animals’ planet!

Ethics … To me the veganic movement makes itself look as if it creates and expresses a bifurcation in what veganism ideally should mean. As good at it looks now and as much as such farming practices are heading for the major part in a promising and important and ethically inevitable direction, the veganic code of ethics nevertheless ignores an important factor and that is, again, to include all animals in a life affirming way.

This fallacy in the veganic vegan understanding makes vegans overall look as if this movement was basically about clearing nonhuman animals in their positives – and as living facts and individual fates – simply out of our lives!

I think there is morally something going drastically wrong with us.

This text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Der vegane ökologische Fußabdruck. Teil 2

Gita Yegane Arani-Prenzel

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fußabdruck wenn Du vegan lebst?

Teil 2

Dieser Artikel als PDF

Eine vegane Lebens- und Ernährungsweise bringt viele ökologische Vorteile mit sich. Dennoch, wer vegan ist, sollte sich über die größeren Zusammenhänge, über Ursachen und Wirkungsweise von Umweltzerstörung und Speziesismus Gedanken machen und seinen Lebensstil auch gemäß seiner neu gewonnenen Erkenntnisse korrigieren. Ein weitreichendes, umfassendes Denken ist nötig, um geringere Schäden anzurichten als man es mit seiner gegenwärtigen Lebensweise vielleicht noch tut. Denn sogar die potenziell pazifistischste aller Lebensweisen, die vegane Lebensweise, kann immer noch optimiert werden!

Von der Schaffung einer veganen Ökologie

Die Fleischproduktion hat sich seit dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges vervierfacht. Das war in dem Zuge, in dem die volle Industrialisierung der „Nutztier“-haltung und die moderne Tier-Agrarindustrie entstanden. Heute wächst der Bedarf für tierische Produkte in den Großnationen wie China und Indien in einem unabsehbaren Maße; dort, wo die Mittelklasse einen „typisch westlichen“ Lebensstil noch für etwas Nachahmenswertes hält. Auf der anderen Seite sehen wir Nahrungsmittelknappheit, Mangelernährung und Hunger in großen Teilen der Welt. Wir sind konfrontiert mit der globalen Erwärmung, dem Klimawandel, der Verschmutzung der Umwelt durch Abfälle und Gifte. Die Zerstörung ökologisch hoch komplexer Gleichgewichte, die wir Menschen durch beinahe alle Bereiche unseres täglichen Lebens verursachen, ist allgegenwärtig. Wir bezeugen die Rate der Entwaldung auf den Kontinenten, die wachsende Wasserknappheit und die Auslöschung von Spezies. Und all das geschieht hauptsächlich, weil Land zum Anbau von Futtermitteln gebraucht wird, um den unerschütterlichen Hunger der Menschen für Fleisch, Milch und Eier zu stillen, und um Industrien aufrecht zu erhalten, die sich von Tierprodukten als billiger und selbstverständlicher Ressource wirtschaftlich abhängig gemacht haben.

Es gibt keine ökologisch vernünftige und realisierbare Gleichung, die den Bedarf der großen Konsumnationen und derer marktwirtschaftlichen Mechanismen und andererseits notwendiges Menschenrecht weltweit miteinander vereinbar werden ließe. Die Menschheit vernichtet durch ihren Zwang zur Umweltzerstörung ihre eigene Lebensgrundlage durch Produktions- und Konsumprozesse. So befinden wir uns inmitten der größten kulturgeschichtlichen Aporie, der die Menschheit sich, in ihrem Exklusivheitsstatus, mit dem sie sich von der Natur abzugrenzen suchte, je selbst ausliefern konnte.

Wir als Veganer_innen sollten unsere Negativauswirkung auf die natürliche Umwelt, die nichtmenschlichen Tiere und die soziale Menschenwelt in allen Aspekten stetig zu reduzieren suchen und weiterhin abwägen, was für die Welt wirklich beiträglich ist und sein könnte. Wir sollten uns nicht unüberlegt treiben lassen durch das, was die Gesellschaft und das eigene Fortkommen gerade von uns zu verlangen scheinen. Veränderungen müssen auf allen Ebenen geschehen.

Das Autofahren auf das Nötigste zu reduzieren, Wasserverschwendung zu meiden, energieeffizienter die Abläufe im Haushalt und Draußen planen, Urlaub neu zu definieren und sich nicht einfach in den Flieger zu setzen, das sind alles Schritte die wir tun sollten. Was wir als „Standard“-Veganer aber auf jeden Fall schaffen – und das ist zweifellos der Punkt größter ethischer Relevanz – ist den grundsätzlichsten Beitrag zum Schutz unserer Umwelt zu leisten, durch unsere pflanzliche Ernährungsweise. Tier-, Menschen- und Erdrechte gehören zusammen und diese Zusammenhänge in unserem täglichen Leben und unseren täglichen Entscheidungen zu berücksichtigt sollte unser fortlaufendes Ziel sein.

Vegan zu leben wirkt dem Welthunger entgegen

Die FAO (die Food and Agriculture Organization der UN) erklärt in einem Bericht von 2005, dass mehr als fünf Millionen Kinder jedes Jahr an Hunger sterben. Man rechnet damit, dass sich die Zahl der Weltbevölkerung bis zum Jahr 2050 von 6 Milliarden auf 9 Milliarden Menschen erhöhen wird. Eine der zentralsten Fragen des 21. Jahrhunderts wird sein, wie die Menschheit sich in Zukunft ernähren will oder kann.

Die Verfügbarkeit anbaufähigen Landes ist eines der Haupthindernisse in der Nahrungsmittelerzeugung. Die Welt hat nur ein begrenztes Maß an Land, das zum Anbau eingesetzt werden kann. Es ist daher also entscheidend, wie solches Land bestellt wird um damit ausreichend Menschen versorgen zu können.

Die typische Ernährungsform des Westens, die primär auf tierischen Produkten basiert, spielt eine wesentliche Rolle dabei, dass Menschen in den ärmeren Regionen der Welt der Zugang zu ausreichend und gesunden Lebensmitteln verwährt ist. Die Funktionsweisen der Tieragrarindustrie und des Marktes sind komplex und schwer durchschaubar, aber die Zusammenhänge zwischen Welthunger, Mangelernährung und der Tierausbeutung durch die Agrarindustrien bestehen.

Feststeht, dass unterschiedliche Studien aufzeigen, dass die vegane Ernährungsweise (und die vegane Lebensweise insgesamt in ihrem Verzicht auf alle tierischen Produkte un Nebenerzeugnisse) nur ein Drittel der Anbaufläche bedarf, als das für die typische westliche tierprodukt-dependente Lebensweise nötig ist.

Fruchtbare Äcker und intaktes Land

Zu Gründen für die gefährliche Bodendegradation zählen die Überweidung zu 35%, die Entwaldung zu 30% und landwirtschaftliche Vorgehensweisen zu 27%. [1] Diese Schädigungsursachen sind direkt oder indirekt verbunden mit dem Verbrauch tierischer Produkte.

Das World Recources Institute (WRI, http://www.wri.org/) erklärt, dass fast 40% der Agrarlandfläche weltweit ernsthaft degrativ geschädigt sind. Das International Food Policy Research Insitute (IFPRO, http://www.ifpri.org/), das sich mit nachhaltiger Nahrungsversorgung und Welthunger befasst, geht davon aus, dass wenn Land und Anbaufläche weiter wie im gegenwärtigen Maße geschädigt werden, zusätzliche 150 bis 360 Millionen Hektar Land bis zum Jahr 2020 nicht mehr zum Anbau nutzbar sein werden. [2]

Der Zuwachs der Weltpopulation ist somit nicht der einzige Faktor, der in Betracht gezogen werden muss, wenn Prognosen für die zukünftige Nahrungsmittelsicherheit gestellt werden. Die Fläche fruchtbaren Landes, das zum Anbau von Ernten eingesetzt werden kann, verringert sich zunehmends, und die Weiterführung intensiver Produktion auf bereits geschädigtem Land stellt keine nachhaltige Lösung dar.

Der Teufelskreis der unvermeidlich entsteht, ist der, dass Menschen wegen weniger fruchtbarer Böden die Bestellflächen ausdehnen müssen. Die damit einhergehende Entwaldung verursacht eine weitere Verschlechterung der Böden. Ein circulus vitiosus und Gipfel unserer allein nutzungsorietierten landwirtschaftlichen Praktiken.

Eine vegane Ökonomie sollte idealerweise bedarfs- statt gewinnorientiert sein, und statt blindem Konsumentenverhalten, sollte eine Ausrichtung auf die natürlichen Notwendigkeiten und der Einklang mit der natürlichen Welt angestrebt werden. Die Natur, statt die durch den Konsum angeregten Lebensfiktionen, sollte zum Fokalpunkt im Realitätsbewusstsein der Menschen werden. Ein veganer Lebensstil und ein neues ethisches Denken, das den Veganismus als Idee umfasst, können dabei wirksam helfen, die weitere Zerstörung wertvollen fruchtbaren Landes und der Natur zu verhindern.

Keine kompromittierenden Kompromisse und kein Flexitarismus können helfen

Spätestens seit dem United Nations FAO Bericht von 2006 gilt speziell auch die Geflügelindustrie als besonders umweltgefährdend, nicht zuletzt weil sie ein noch stark anwachsender Zweig der tierausbeutenden Industrien darstellt. [3] [4]

Die Wahl der bevorzugten Tierspezies zum Verzehr und zur Ausbeutung und die pervertierte “artgerechte” Perfektionierung in den Voraussetzungen zur Haltung von nichtmenschlichen Tieren, spiegeln einen prinzipiellen fortlaufenden Versuch das alte Bild und stereotype Ideal vom Menschen als omnivor-carnivoren Prädatoren und Jäger und Sammler zu retten, statt sich über die gegenwärtigen ökologischen Notwendigkeiten tatsächlich Gedanken zu machen. Die Vernunft und das Bewusstsein, die es braucht um über die ethische „Miteinanderschaft“ von Mensch und Tier in der natürlichen Welt  nachzudenken, sind in unseren Kulturen noch immer weitestgehend unterentwickelt.

Wälder retten

Wir alle brauchen Wälder zum Leben, in jeder Hinsicht. Sie sind unsere Lungen, sie schlucken enorme Massen an Kohlendioxid und spenden dafür Sauerstoff, sie regulieren die Klimaverhältnisse, schützen vor Überflutungen, schützen kostbare Böden und beheimaten Millionen verschiedener Tierarten/Tierindividuen und beherbergen ihre unglaublich reichen und faszinierenden Pflanzenwelten und Welten anderen organischen Lebens. Auch das Fortbestehen Tausender indigener Völker hängt vom Schutz ihrer Heimatwälder ab. Aber der Wald wird rapide zerstört, ohne jegliche Möglichkeit das, was der Welt, den Tieren und den Menschen dadurch verloren geht, jemals wiederherzustellen.

Wie das, was wir auf unseren Tellern haben einen effektiven Unterschied macht, auch in Sachen globaler Entwaldung

Außer dass Abholzung geschieht wegen der Gewinnung von Holz, Papier und Brennstoffen, findet die Entwaldung auch statt um Weideland zu gewinnen und für den Futtermittelanbau für diejenigen Tiere, die permanent oder überwiegend in Agrareinrichtungen in Hallen oder anderen Einsperrungssystemen gehalten werden.

Schätzungen des World Recources Institute gehen davon aus, dass 20-30% der einstig bewaldeten Landfläche der Erde bereits der Agrarkultur weichen mussten und für Agrarzwecke abgeholzt wurden. Da das Agrarland aber zunehmend geschädigt ist, muss zur Ersetzung der depletierten Flächen wiederum eine weitere Entwaldung stattfinden.

Die Ausweitung von Agrarland ist für mehr als 60% der weltweiten Entwaldung verantwortlich. Das meiste dieses erschlossenen und genutzten Landes wird zur Fütterung von Rindern zu Agrarzwecken benutzt. Der UN FAO Bericht ‚Livestock’s Long Shadow’ hält fest, dass „bis zum Jahr 2010 Rinder auf etwa 24 Millionen Hektar neotropoischen Landes grasen werden, das im Jahr 2000 noch bewaldet war.“ [6] Dieser Prozess wird zynischer- und grausamerweise als die „Hamburgerisierung“ der Wälder bezeichnet – in den USA nennt man „Hackfleisch“ umgangssprachlich auch „Hamburger“.

Die vegane Lebensweise kann durch ihre Praxis und Ethik wesentlich dazu beitragen, die Ausbeutung des Reproduktivsystems nichtmenschlicher Tiere zu bekämpfen und damit einhergehend auch die Wälder der Welt zu schützen.

Die natürliche Integrität der nichtmenschlichen Tiere und der Natur müssen zusammen geschützt werden um zu einer vernünftigen Sinngebung unserer eigenen Existenz in der Welt zu gelangen.

Fortsetzung

Der vegane ökologische Fußabdruck. Teil 3. Tierrechte, der Schutz der Artenvielfalt und Schutzhöfe für unsere „domestizierten“ Tierfreunde

http://simorgh.de/vegan/wie_gross_ist_dein_oekologischer_fussabdruck_3.pdf

Quellen

[1] United Nations Environment Programme, GEO: Global Environment Outliook, Land degradation, http://www.unep.org/geo/geo3/english/141.htm letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[2] News & Views – A 2020 Vision for Food, Agriculture, and the Environment – March 1999: Are We Ready for a Meat Revolution? (IFPRI, 1999, 8 p.), How Large a Threat Is Soil Degradation? http://www.nzdl.org/gsdlmod?e=d-00000-00—off-0fnl2.2–00-0—-0-10-0—0—0direct-10—4——-0-1l–11-en-50—20-about—00-0-1-00-0–4—-0-0-11-10-0utfZz-8-00&cl=CL2.10.6&d=HASH0152336f21ea37b260b944e2.3&x=1 letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[3] Steinfeld H, Gerber P, Wassenaar T, Castel V, Rosales M, de Haan C. Livestock’s Long Shadow: Environmental Issues and Options. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 2006. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367646/ letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[4] P. Gerber, C. Opio and H. Steinfeld, Poultry production and the environment – a review, Animal Production and Health Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy, http://www.fao.org/AG/againfo/home/events/bangkok2007/docs/part2/2_2.pdf letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

[5] Porter, G. and J. W. Brown, Table of Deforesation and its Effects, https://confluence.furman.edu:8443/display/Lipscomb/Deforestation+and+Effects+(MB) letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012. Siehe auch Global Environmental Politics. (Westview Press,Boulder,Colorado) 1991.

[6] UN FAO, Livestock’s long shadow, Chapter 5, Biodiversityftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/010/a0701e/a0701e05.pdf letzter Zugriff vom 30. Nov. 2012.

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fußabdruck wenn Du vegan lebst?

Gita Yegane Arani-Prenzel

Der ökologische Fußabdruck einer veganen Ernährungsweise im Vergleich zur omnivoren / carnivoren Ernährung

Dieser Artikel als PDF

Eine Ernährungsumstellung auf die vegane Ernährungs- und Lebensweise ist, sowohl auf individueller als auch auf gesellschaftlicher Ebene, der folgenreichste Schritt zur Reduzierung  unseres ökologischen Fußabdrucks, der getan werden kann. Ein vierköpfiger Haushalt der eine Woche lang auf Fleisch, Eier und Milchprodukte verzichtet, macht sich dadurch um vergleichsweise soviel umweltverträglicher, als würde dieser Haushalt ein dreiviertel Jahr lang auf das Autofahren verzichten, so die amerikanische Umwelt-NGO ‚Environmental Working Group’ (http://www.ewg.org/).

Was wir essen?

Fleischesser bzw. Carnivore (oder auch Omnivore, die „alles“ essen) verzehren das Fleisch domestizierter und wildlebender Tiere, einschließlich „Geflügel“ (also Vögel) und „Fisch“ (also Fische).

Vegetarier essen alles außer Fleisch

Ovo-Vegetarier essen Eier, aber keine Milchprodukte, und Lakto-Vegetarier wiederum essen Milchprodukte, aber keine Eier. Ovo-Lakto-Vegetarier essen sowohl Eier als auch Milchprodukte.

Man könnte sagen, dass ein echter oder strikter Vegetarier einem Veganer ziemlich nah kommen müsste in seiner Ernährungsweise. Veganer_innen essen kein Fleisch, keine Eier, keine Milchprodukte, und, was aber hinzu kommt, auch keinen Honig! Darüberhinaus vermeiden sie allen Konsum, Gebrauch und Verzehr jeglicher tierischer Produkte und derer Derivate und Nebenerzeugnisse. Die Vegan Society in Großbritannien empfiehlt den Veganismus konsequent in allen Lebensbereichen durchzusetzen, soweit es für den einzelnen praktizierbar ist.

Was ich esse ist doch umweltverträglich, oder?

Das Global Footprint Network (http://www.footprintnetwork.org) eine Denkfabrik die sich mit der Nachhaltigkeitsforschung befasst, sagt, der ökologische Fußabdruck „bemisst das Maß, in dem wir Ressourcen konsumieren und Abfallstoffe produzieren, verglichen mit der Kapazität der Natur unsere Ausstöße zu verarbeiten und neue Ressourcen zu schaffen.“

Der Kreislauf von Lebensmittelkonsum und -herstellung ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil des ökologischen Fußabdrucks. Man bemisst ihn zumeist daran, wie viel Hektar biologisch-produktiver Anbaufläche und Meeresfläche benötigt wird, um den Nahrungsbedarf eines Individuums oder einer Gemeinschaft zu decken.

Und was macht da das Fleisch?

Im Jahr 2006 erklärte die Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) der Vereinten Nationen, dass die Nutztierhaltung inbesondere zur Fleischproduktion, verantwortlich zu machen sei für etwa ein Fünftel der Treibhausgase weltweit; man gab öffentlich auf hoher Ebene zu, dass die Nutztierhaltung massiv zur globalen Erwärmung beiträgt.

Eine neuere Untersuchung des Woldwatch Institute (http://www.worldwatch.org/), einer Umwelt-Denkfabrik aus Washington D.C., erfasst aber noch weitere versteckte Faktoren der „Nutztier“-haltung, die zu den Emissionen beitragen, und man kommt in deren Studie auf einundfünfzig Prozent aller Treibgase, für die die Nutztierhaltung weltweit verantwortlich zu machen ist. [1]

Die größeren Zusammenhänge

Ein Faktor, der auch in die empfindliche Waagschale des zerstörten ökologischen Gleichgewichts und dem nicht enden wollenden menschlichen Konsum mit hineingeworfen werden muss, ist die Frage nach der Wasserknappheit, insbesondere den Dürren und den auf sie folgenden Engpässen in der Sicherheit zur Verfügung stehender Nahrungsmittel. [2]

Eine Nahrungsmittelknappheit könnte die Welt zum Vegetarismus zwingen, titelt ein Artikel im ‚Guardian’ vom August 2012: [3]

„Die Annahme einer vegetarischen Ernährungsweise“ [konsequenterweise müsste es eine vegane Lebensweise heißen, da, wenn Tiere Milch, Eier und Leder produzieren sollen, sie dazu auch zur Körperausbeute gehalten werden müssen], so der Artikel im ‚Guardian’, „ist ein Weg, um in einer zuhnehmend klimagestörten Welt die Wassermengen zu erhalten, die nötig wären zum Anbau von mehr Nahrung,“ so die im Guardian zitierten Wissenschaflter, „[…] tierische proteinreiche Lebensmittel brauchen zu ihrer Erzeugung zehn Mal mehr Mengen an Wasser, als die vegetarische Nahrungsmittelerzeugung. Ein Drittel der kultivierbarsten Landfläche in der Welt wird zum Anbau von Ernten verwendet, die der Tierfütterung dienen. Zu den anderen Optionen, die dabei helfen können Menschen zu ernähren, gehört eine Reduzierung von [Lebensmittel-] Abfällen und eine Steigerung des Handels zwischen denjenigen Ländern, die Überschüsse an Nahrungsmitteln produzieren mit denjenigen Ländern, in denen Mangel herrscht.“

Der Viehzucht-Sektor bietet für zahllose Menschen in den ärmsten Regionen der Welt Nahrung und Einkünfte, so argumentieren manche Befürworter der Fleischindustrie. Das ‚Heifer Projekt’ beispielsweise, sieht seine Aufgabe in einer Art humanitärer Arbeit, die daraus besteht, Armen und Bedürftigen in Schwellen- und Entwicklungsländern „Nutztiere“ als argarwirtschafltiche Einkunftsquelle und Nahrungslieferanten auf Spendenbasis zu liefern. Auch gibt es Förderungsprogramme westlicher Nationen, wie die sogenannte ‘Livestock Revolution’, die ihre Fördermaßnahmen mit der Übernahme viehzüchterischer Techniken und Handhabungsweisen als Bedingungsvariablen verknüpfen.

Die speziesistische Behauptung, Menschen sei durch die Ausbeutung von Tieren geholfen, soll glauben machen machen, dass die argarwirtschaftliche Tierhaltung etwas den Menschen Gutes und Förderliches sei, und nicht zuletzt ist in den meisten Kulturen der Welt tatsächlich eine Trennung des Einsatzes nichtmenschlicher Tiere als Lebensressourcen von menschlicher Identität, Kultur und Gesellschaft noch immer kaum denkbar.

Der Mythos rund um die Nostalgie des Kleinbauern erscheint aber zunehmend als umstrittener. Offenkundig wird das erkennbar bei der Kritik an den westlichen Biobauern, bei denen ihr Fauxpax in der Langzeitutopie sichtbar wird: man könne den Fleischkonsum in Maßen retten, im Zeitalter des Massenkonsums. Daneben existiert in der Bioindustrie auch noch das weitaus größere Problem der Missstände in der Tierhaltung, die sich in den großen Agrareinrichtungen und den kleinen Bauernhöfen kaum unterscheiden. Tiere sind eben fühlende, freiheitsbegabte und tierlich-denkende Lebewesen, und keine Form der Ausbeutung und Tiertötung zu gleich welchen menschlichen Zwecken können da eine Ausnahme bilden.

Was die Nutztierhaltung in den Entwicklungsgebieten der Welt anbetrifft, so muss man sich darüber im Klaren sein, dass Kleinbauern auch Teil des Systems der Ausbeutung tierlicher Körper sind. Kleinbauern sind durch Großbetriebe ersetzbar um einen zunehmenden und stimulierten Bedarf an tierischen Produkten zu decken, der sich aus komplexen kulturellen und wirtschaftlichen Faktoren zwangsläufig heraus entwickelt. Sowohl bewaldetes und „wildes“ Land, so auch die Böden, die als freie Anbauflächen bestellt werden können, verschwinden in Zuge eines argarwitschaftlichen „Erwachens“ und werden einer industriellen Nutzbarkeit unterworfen.

Mehr als 80 Prozent des Wachstums im Viehzucht-Sektor kommt heute von den industriellen Produktionssystemen. Die Viehzucht ist ein Faktor, der knappes Land, sauberes Wasser und andere natürliche Ressourcen für die ärmsten der Menschen schluckt und der freien Lebensraum für Tiere zerstört. Die Abhängigkeit von einem zunehmend industrialisierten Lebensstandard, auch wenn solch ein Standard sich auf einem Minimum bewegen mag, ist kaum wieder aufzulösen. Auch ist die Vorstellung vom Fleischkonsum als einem Ausdruck von sozialem Prestige, ein Glaube, dem Menschen immer noch allzu leicht verfallen.

Fortsetzung

Wie groß ist Dein ökologischer Fussabdruck, wenn Du vegab lebst? Teil 2: Von der Schaffung einer veganen Ökologie

http://simorgh.de/vegan/wie_gross_ist_dein_oekologischer_fussabdruck_2.pdf

Quellen

[1] Robert Goodland, Jeff Anhang: Livestock and Climate Change, World Watch November/December 2009, http://www.worldwatch.org/files/pdf/Livestock%20and%20Climate%20Change.pdf  (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).

[2] A. Jägerskog, T. Jønch Clausen (eds.): Feeding a thirsty world: Challenges and opportunities for a water and food secure world, Stockhold International Water Institute, 2012, http://www.siwi.org/sa/node.asp?node=52&sa_content_url=%2Fplugins%2FResources%2Fresource.asp&id=318 (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).

[3] John Vidal: Food shortages could force world into vegetarianism, warn scientists, The Guardian, 26. Aug. 2012, http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/aug/26/food-shortages-world-vegetarianism (letzter Zugriff vom 27.11.2012).

 

Würden Sie wegen Ihres Veganismus auch auf Gott und Glauben verzichten?

Palang LY

„Macht Euch die Erde untertan“ 1. Mose (1)

Würden Sie wegen Ihres Veganismus auch auf Gott und Glauben verzichten?

Wenn wir Tiere nicht als Produkte, als Ware betrachten, als Besitz mit dem man machen kann was man will, wieso sind wir dann bereit hinzunehmen, dass Tiere auf dem Altar der Religionen oder traditioneller Bräuche geopfert werden? Wir schließen Zirkusse und Pelz aus, obgleich auch sie Bestandteile unserer spezisistischen „Kulturen“ sind. Aber wenn es um den Glauben geht, dann ist uns unser Gott wichtiger als das Recht, das wir nichtmenschlichen Tiere zuteil werden lassen müssten, um als Menschen wirklich gerecht/er zu werden.

Sollten wir nicht von vegan lebenden Menschen erwarten können, dass sie wissen, dass ein Tier nicht nur im Bezug auf Kommerz und Großindustrie verdinglicht und objektifiziert werden darf?

Manche sprechen vom Respekt gegenüber Tieren, der ausreiche um der Tierrechtsfrage gerecht zu werden. Und sie sagen es sei akzeptabel Tiere aus religiösen (sprich aus „geheiligten“) Gründen zu töten, wenn man dem Tier nur ausreichend Respekt gegenüber brächte. Und man soll das Tier, das zum Opfer wird, „human“ Töten. Das ist kein veganer Standpunkt, denn der Veganimus fordert, dass kein Tier zum menschlichen Nutzen eingesetzt werden darf. Die Religion kann hier keine Sonderregelung schaffen, denn es geht im Veganimus um Tiere und nicht um Gott.

Es geht um Lebewesen und das Leben. Wenn ich ein Tier meinen Zwecken unterwerfe, um es zu benutzen, zu verletzen und zu töten, dann lässt sich das nicht mit einer veganen Ethik auf sinnvolle Weise verbinden, auch wenn eine Religion solches von mir fordern möchte.

Manche sagen, das möge schon stimmen, aber so schnell könnten wir mit einem Umdenken bei religiös denkenden Menschen nicht rechnen, wenn überhaupt. Wir seien mit der veganen Bewegung ja überhaupt erst am Anfang und Religion und auf ihnen fußende traditionelle Bräuche könne man nicht von heute auf morgen abschaffen.

Solch eine Denkrichtung ist nicht ganz richtig. Denn auch wenn Gesellschaften – die im Westen oder die in der östlichen Hemisphäre gelegene Gesellschaften – bislang weit entfernt davon sind sich in Richtung eines Bewusstseins zu bewegen, dass Tiere auf ethische und affirmative Weise mit einbeschließen würde, nichtsdestotrotz richten sich unsere Vorstellungen über die vegane Lebensweise nicht nach dem „wie es in diesem Moment ist“ oder dem „wie es in der Vergangenheit war“, sondern nach dem „wie es sein sollte“!

Eine Utopie hat es bis hierher geschafft, und eine Utopie kann es, wenn sie nur konsequent durchgeführt wird, auch noch weiter schaffen.

So gravierende Lücken, wie die Inkaufnahme des Tieropfers in Religionen – d. h. rituelle und traditionelle Bräuche unangetastet zu lassen – bergen, außer dem Unrecht das sie aus Tierrechtssicht darstellen, die Gefahr der Verwässerung in sich für die, die meinen dass beides ging: konsequenter Veganismus und das Festhalten an einem Glauben, der das Gehorsam über die Vernunft setzt.

Der Sinn des Veganismus als das bislang effizienteste Mittel um der Tierausbeutung mit Widerstand zu begegnen, erscheint im Kontext von Religiosität fragwürdig, wenn die Religion den Menschen sowieso an die obeste Stelle der Schöpfung setzt. Eine Ergänzug im ethischen Codex wäre dann nowendig, kann in einem religiösen Denksystem aber nicht wirklich vollzogen werden, weil hier ja nur Gott und die von ihm auserkorenen solche gravierenden Entscheidungen über Sein und nicht sein und den Wert des Seins fällen dürfen.

Tiere sind keine Gegenstände, weder zum profanen Handel, noch im “erhabenen” Geiste – weder als Konsumgut, noch für einen Gott dessen menschliche Schöpfung.

(1) „Und Gott segnete sie und sprach zu ihnen: Seid fruchtbar und mehrt euch und füllt die Erde und macht sie euch untertan und herrscht über die Fische im Meer und über die Vögel unter dem Himmel und über alles Getier, das auf Erden kriecht.“
http://bibel-online.net/buch/luther_1912/1_mose/1/ (letzter Zugriff vom 19. Nov. 2012)

From individual to individual

Speciesism and homocentrism are the external manifestations of patterns in thinking that deny animal intelligence, and instead overvalue human intelligence. Humans are mostly behaving contractualist, unpredictable, unreliable, unfair, … and the list could go on in pretty negative terms. I wonder why that is the case, and I think it does not have to be that way.

I think it is possible for a human to be ‘animal intelligent’, to be non-contractualist, predictable, fair, tolerant, loving, … and that list could go on in positive terms. From my experiences with animals I learned about the possibility of ‘animal intelligence’:  The animals I have lived with truly were my best friends.

I think for a person who is truly nonspeciesistic in his/her thoughts and critical about homocentrism  it should be technically possible to really make the shift and start to become a better individual than what humans have per definition been so far, and even prided themselves with.

The time of human intelligence is over for me.

I am glad I defend animal rights from a standpoint of true ‘animal independence’ (of any human paradigm: biology, ethology, philosophy, religion … ).

***

Fragmentary thoughts:

The border around the castle ‘HUMAN’ is the one of scientifical categorizing. Within the castle we claim to be ‘complete’.

BIOLOGICAL HIERARCHISM ALWAYS PUTS HUMAN ‘OBJECTIVITY’ ON TOP OF WHAT IT DENIES THE OTHER SPEICIES: THAT IS ON TOP OF ANIMALS’ OBJECTIVITY

How can absolute objectivity be captured? With which parameters to measure against? Humans’ objectivity claim relies on subjective interests.

Ethical behaviour is one of the components taken out of the frame of an allround objectivity.

Animals get denied for their actions to be viewed as not insinctual.

Subsequently the VALUES of behaviour get ruled out from being within the ethcial scale of social actions between the species, etc.

A term such as ‘ethical’ desribes something that is existent, it’s not an idea in itself – otherwise it would not exist in the correlations…

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Die zerstörende Gewalt. Der Überlaufeffekt oder die Einmaligkeit in der Vorkommnis von Gewalt?

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Vorab: Braucht die Situation des Mensch-Tier-Verhältnisses einen Vergleich zu menschlich intraspezifischenen Situationen zur Hervorhebung von moralischer Relevanz? Wenn nicht, wozu dann die Genozidvergleiche in bezug auf die Situation des Verhältnisses menschlich-destruktiven Verhaltens gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren?

Das Hauptargument, das gegen Genozidvergleiche vorgebracht wird, liegt im Punkt der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen. Eine ausschließliche Zurückführung auf den Begriff der Würde, kann, als ethisches Kriterium, aber nicht zur Ableitung einer einseitigen moralischen Gewichtung angeführt werden, ohne dass dabei eine Abwertung der Problematik der Gewalthandlungen gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere vollzogen wird.

In der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen und dem Problem der Verbrechen gegen die Menschenwürde (gegen die Menschheit oder einen Menschen) liegt keine zwangsläufige ethische Implikation im Bezug auf das Verhältnis des Menschen zu seiner Außen- oder Umwelt, die zu einer allgemeinen Begründbarkeit von Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren führbar wäre oder diese Formen von Gewalt ausdrücklich und in jedem Fall sanktionieren würde.

Der Begriff der Würde kann, gesehen vom Standpunkt der Meinungsfreiheit, auch nicht strikt in seiner Gebundenheit reduziert werden, ohne dass man dabei das Recht auf freie Meinungsäußerung verletzen würde. Dass heißt, dass eine Auffassung eines Menschen über das Vorhandensein der Würde der nichtmenschlichen Tiere – solange er dadurch keinem Menschen schadet, oder Menschen oder einem Menschen dadurch Gewalt antut – in den Bereich seiner Gedankenfreiheit oder seiner freien Meinungsauffassung fällt.

Menschen werden auch als Opfer und auch als Täter als Würdewesen betrachtet, deren Würde man in den Fällen von Morden und Genoziden brechen wollte; zumindest wurde dies in der Menschheitsgeschichte immer wieder versucht.

Tieren wurde in der Menschheitsgeschichte von keiner Gesellschaft eine Würde einer Unantasbarkeit ihres Tierseins zuerteilt. Damit ist die Besonderheit der Tragweite ihrer Opferposition nicht problemlos mit derer menschlicher Opfer zu vergleichen.

In jeder Situation, in der ein Gewaltverübender ein Opfer schafft, wird man in der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Problem oder dem Fall, Parallelen zu anderen Gewaltsituationen ziehen. Bei Gewalt an sich, unabhängig von der dadurch betroffenen „Angriffsfläche“ oder dem geschaffenen Objekt von Gewalt, kann man vermuten, dass die Motivationen (Destruktivitätswillen, -bereitschaft, gewaltbereite Eigenbezogenheit, Aggression) im Täter übergreifend ähnlich strukturiert sein können, auch weil das letztendliche Ziel oder intendierte Ergebnis von Gewalt: der Mord, die Tötung, d.h. die Zerstörung eines Opfers ist.

Nun verhält es sich aber so, dass die Frage, warum ein Täter sich ein spezifisches Opfer oder eine spezifische Opfergruppe sucht, ganz unterschiedliche Gründe in sich birgt. Auch ist die konkrete Qualität oder Struktur von Gewalt ein maßgeblicher Faktor, der auf die zugundeliegenden Ursachen von Gewalt und die spezifische Gewaltpsychologie zurückschließen lässt.

Produziert gegalt gegen Tiere, Gewalt gegen Menschen? Wenn nicht, warum bestehen dennoch Zusammenhänge in der Gewaltpsychologie

Die Unterscheidungen im Täter-Opfer Verhältnis zwischen potenziellen Opfern, und die Überlappungsmöglichkeiten in der Gewaltbereitschaft ihnen gegenüber, läge in der Frage des sogenannten Spillover-Effekts (Überlaufeffekts):

Die Frage ist, wenn ich dem einen Opfer etwas antue, bin ich dann automatisch auch einem oder mehreren anderen potenziellen Opfern gewaltbereit gegenüber?

Und, dem gegeüberliegend: hat das eine Opfer von Gewalt automatisch dadurch, dass es zum Gewaltopfer wurde, etwas mit einem anderen Opfer einer Form gewaltbereiter Handlung grundlegend gemein, außer dass beide in einer Position des Opfers sind? Liegt irgend etwas auf der Seite des Opfers, das die Gewaltbereitschaft eines Täters auf sich zieht?

Robert Nozick hat die Frage des sogenannten Spillovers vor dem Vordergrund des Mensch-Tier Verhältnisses in der Form beschrieben:

‘[…] Manche sagen, dass Leute nicht so handeln sollten, da solche Handlungen sie brutalisieren und sie die Wahrscheinlichkeit bei der Person erhöhen, das Leben anderer Personen zu nehmen (wir können hinzufügen “oder andererweise zu verletzen”); allein aus der Freude daran. Diese Handlungen, die moralisch nicht an sich in Frage zu stellen sind, sagen sie, haben einen unerwünschten moralischen ‘spillover’ (Überlaufeffekt). (Dinge wären dann anders, wenn es keine Möglichkeit für solch einen ‘spillover’ geben würde – zum Beispiel für die Person, die von sich selber weiß, dass sie die letzte Person auf der Welt ist.) Aber warum sollte es da solch einen ‘spillover’ geben? Wenn es an sich völlig richtig ist, Tieren in irgendeiner Weise etwas anzutun, aus irgendeinem Grund, welchem auch immer, dann, vorausgesetzt eine Person realisiert die klare Linie zwischen Personen und Tieren, und behält dies in ihrem Kopf während sie handelt, warum sollte das Töten von Tieren dazu neigen, sie [die Person] zu brutalisieren und die Wahrscheinlichkeit erhöhen, dass sie [andere] Personen verletzen oder töten könnte? Begehen Metzger mehr Morde? (Als andere Personen die Messer in ihrer Nähe haben?) Wenn es mir Spaß macht einen Baseball fest mit einem Baseballschläger zu schlagen, erhöht dies in bedeutender Weise die Gefahr, dass ich dasselbe mit jemandens Kopf tun würde? Bin ich nicht imstande dazu, zu verstehen, dass sich Leute von Basebällen unterscheiden, und verhindert dieses Verständnis nicht den ‘spillover’? Warum sollten Dinge anders sein im Fall von Tieren. Um es klar zu sagen, es ist eine empirische Frage ob ein ‘spillover’ stattfindet oder nicht; aber es besteht ein Rätsel darüber, warum es das tun sollte.’ (1)

Diese Unterscheidung wird im Falle von nichtmenschlichen Tieren in auffallend deutlicher Weise vollzogen (Speziesismus). Ein Tier physisch zu schädigen oder zu zerstören, es zu töten, verhält sich im Rahmen unserer Gesetze als Sachbeschädigung, nicht als Körperverletzung oder Mord; während das Opfer-werden beim Menschen durch soziale, ethische, religiöse und gesetzliche Konstrukte eine andere Bewertung erhält.

Im Bezug auf Genozide kann man also sagen, die Menschen, die zum Opfer wurden, wurden vor diesem Hindergrund betrachtet, bewusst zum Opfer gemacht. Sie wurden bewusst aus dem ethischen und gesetzlichen Rahmen gewaltsam hinausbefördert.

Anders verhält sich die Situation der nichtmenschlichen Tiere in ihrer Rolle im Rahmen der spezisitischen und homozentrischen menschlichen Beurteilung. Wie schon gesagt gilt die Körperverletzung nichtmenschlicher Tiere nicht oder kaum als „Verletzung“, da die ethische Klassifizierung nichtmenschlicher Tiere, deren Leidenskapazitäten und damut auch deren Würde, bislang nicht mit im Rahmen der Verpflichtungen ethischen Sozialverhaltens ansiedelt. Wobei wir es hierbei tatsächlich mit einem neuen Komplex der Ethik zu tun hätten, dem Interspezies-Sozialverhalten. (2)

Die ganze anthropologische Konstellation einer homozentrisch ausgerichteten Welt, muss in ihrer Konkretheit untersucht und überdacht werden. Analogsetzungen reichen nicht, um hier zu einer ethisch-moralischen Lösung zu gelangen. Wegen der konkreten Beschaffenheit, aus der sich die diskriminatorische Haltung gegenüber der autonomen Bedeutung nichtmenschlicher Tiere zusammensetzt – aus dem Grund der ganz speziellen Form von Gewalt in diesem Fall – kann man keine ausreichende Analogie festmachen, um Ursachen besser verstehen zu können und diese Art der Manifetation von Gewalt (eben der gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere) zu bekämpfen. Damit bleibt aber auch der Genozid am Menschen ein vorwiegend gesondert zu behandelndes Phänomen.

Ausschließlich der Vergleich der Gewaltbereitschaft beim Menschen lässt Parallelen in den Täterpsychologien entdecken. Das hat mit dem jeweiligen Opfer aber nicht unmittelbar etwas zu tun. Warum „jemand“ zum Opfer wird, hängt mit schwer zu ergründenden psychologischen Ursachen auf Seiten des Täters zusammen. Wenn, als stereotypes Beispiel, ein betrunkener Mann einen anderen im Affekt wegen einer banalen Streitigkeit tötschlägt oder eine Frau Opfer einer Vergewaltigung wird, liegt in beiden Fällen zum einen der Aspekt der Gewaltbereitschaft des Täters vor, zum anderen aber wird ein Opfer aus völlig verschiedenen Motivationen heraus gewählt. Oder: als „Hexen“ im Mittelalter als solche klassifiziert und gefoltert wurden, lag eine andere Motivation zugrunde als bei Folterungen im islamischen Gewaltregime des Iran oder wiederum bei den Folterungen Oppositioneller in der Militätdiktatur Pinochets in Chile.

Der Umstand dessen, Opfer geworden zu sein, also des Verletztwordenseins des Opfers in seiner Würde als menschliches Individuum selbst, hat niemals Rechnung für die Tätermotivation zu tragen. Man kann die Gewaltmotivation nicht hauptsächlich über die Position oder Eigenschaften des Opfers ableiten, da das Opfer nur im indirekten Zusammenhang in ein Gewaltvergehen und in die Gewalt generell eingebunden wird. (Dabei sollte man nicht vergessen: es gibt keine ethische Grundsatzlegitimierung zur Gewalt, außer derer der Selbstverteidigung oder des Schutzes. Am deutlichsten ist die indirekte Einbindung eines Opfers in der Anwendung von Gewaltmitteln zur Erzielung politischer, ideologischer oder religiöser Macht.)

Ebenso würde man keinen direkten Vergleich zwischen der Strategie z.B. der Hexenprozesse zu der Struktur der Nazigewalt gegen ihre Opfer ziehen, weil die Komplexität der Formen von Gewaltbereitschaft in den spezifischen Fällen anders erklärt werden müssen.

Die Frage der Ursachen, der Psychologie des Täters und die Fragen der Gewaltstruktur sind maßgeblich für die Erklärung über die Motivation von Gewalt und ihrer Formation. Das einzige was eine generelle Schnittmenge darstellt, zwischen allen Formen der Gewalt, ist die Gewalt selbst.

Gewalt hat Ursachen und Folgen. Die Folgen müssen in einem differenzierten Verhältnis zu den Ursachen analysiert werden, da die Ursachen oft allein dem Täter (besonders auffallend im Fall von Persönlichkeitsstörungen (3)) oder einer Tätergruppe zugeordnet werden können, und die Folgen aber die konkrete (von Täter gewollte) Einbindung des Opfers in die Gewaltpsychologie des Täters anbelangen.

Das was nun die menschliche Gesellschaft nichtmenschlichen Tieren gewaltsam antut, braucht einen eigenen Begriff der dem Sachverhalt gerecht wird. Die Bezeichnung „Holocaust“ sollte als Bezeichnung klar umrissen bleiben: Das Wort an sich bezeichnete in religiösen oder rituellen Kontexten die überbleibende Asche oder vollständige Verbrennung eines Tieropfers! Das Wort hat heute die uns allen bekannte Bedeutung im Bezug auf den Menschenmord, vor allem an den Juden durch die Nationalsozialisten im Dritten Reich. Man hat bezüglich der Gefahr von Atomwaffen und den Abwurf der Atombombe auf Hiroshima auch von einem ‚nuclear holocaust’ gesprochen, und das Englische ‚holocaust’ wurde im angelsächsischen Sprachgebrauch häufig als Synonym für den Begriff Genozid – den Massenmord an Menschen durch Menschen – angewendet.
Es ist zweifelhaft ob es irgendeinen Sinn in der Sache der Tierrechte oder der Menschenrechte macht, eine Analogie durch den Begriff des „Holokaust“ aufzeigen zu wollen. Denn dieser Versuch der Gleichsetzung trägt weder zu einer weitergreifenden Erfassung der Problematik nichtmenschlicher Tiere in einer homozentrischen Welt bei, noch kann er wirklich die Ursache von Greueltaten die Menschen an Menschen begehen oder begangen haben klären.

Ich glaube, dass solange keine Übereinkunft in der Bezeichnung des Komplexes menschlicher Gewalt gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere besteht, man begrifflich weiterkommen könnte, indem man die Unbeschrieblichkeit und die Unfassbarkeit erstmal bestehen lässt. Man hat für das, was wir heute „Tiertötung“ und „Tiermord“ nennen, noch keinen ausreichenden Begriffsrahmen geschaffen und damit auch keinen eigenen umschreibenden Begriff zur Hand.

Abschließend: Es geht in diesem Text nicht darum, durch die Aufwertung oder vielleicht eher anders Bewertung der Tierproblematik, die Würde des Menschen in irgendeiner Weise in Frage stellen zu wollen. Sondern es geht darum, dass dem Problem der Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren in seinem eigenen Recht Aufmerksamkeit erteilt werden muss.

(1) Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia, New York: Basic Books, 1974, S. 36.
(2) Dieser Punkt würde so etwas wie ein Interspezies-Sozialverhalten anbelangen, das aber abgesehen von einigen wenigen Beispielen in der Tierrechtsliteratur bislang wenig Interesse gefunden hat.
(3) In Großbritannien führten Diskussion über die psychologische oder kriminelle Einstufung von ‚personality disorders’ vor forensischem Hintergrund zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Einstufung nicht-therapierbarer Persönlichkeitsstörungen für die Rechtsprechung ein nicht klar addressierbarer Problemfall bleibt.

Das Acrylbild oben stammt von Farangis Yegane http://crownofthecreation.farangis.de/birds.one. Dieser Text wurde von Gita Yegane Arani-May verfasst und ist im Veganswines Reader 08 erschienen.

Dieser Text als PDF (öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

Aus dem Vegan*Swines Reader IV (2012): Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Diese Informationen basiert auf Erfahrungswerten von Tierrettungs- bzw. schutzhöfen und den Recherchen bekannter Tierrechts- bzw. schutzorganisationen. Die Angaben beziehen sich auf die Realität in westeuropäischen und US-amerikanischen Agrarbetrieben.

Eine „humane“ Umgehensweise sollte eigentlich bedeuten, mit Respekt und Einfühlungsvermögen mit den Lebewesen umzugehen, die auf unsere Hilfe angewiesen sind. Es ist egal, ob es dabei um Menschen oder um Tiere geht. Das, was wir genau unter „humanen“, also menschlichen Werten verstehen, läßt darauf zurückschließen, auf welchem Level sich der gegenwärtige Aufgeklärtheitsstatus unserer Kultur befindet.

Würden wir die gleichen Methoden, die wir in der Aufzucht, Versorgung, und Tötung von Farmtieren praktizieren, auf unsere Haustiere anwenden, dann wäre das gesetzeswidrig und jeder normale Mensch würde so eine Behandlungsweise von Tieren als erschreckend und grausam empfinden … diesen Text als PDF lesen / downloaden (Link öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

Common sense as a basis for morality in Animal Rights

Use your sense of justice, when you judge nonhuman animals, use your common sense, when you judge animals.

When natural scientist make findings about how an animal brain works, how animal psychology works, cognition, consciousness, it means they will do 1. invasive research at some point, and 2. they will be using parameters that are strictly homoncentric, meaning the frame of reference they apply moves only within a “human” framework of “objectivity”.

A real Animal Rights revolution would require people to step back from human parameters. A real Animal Rights revolution would mean we as humans are able to face nonhuman animals on the level where we allow them to be different but still respect their untouchable integrity in this natural world that we all live in and are born into.

When we want to give nonhuman animals our definitions, we should as Animal Rights people make sure we don’t impose a worldview onto them and their concerns, that is not theirs (and thus not in THEIR interest). If we can’t accept that animals have their own views of the world, then we deny them real and autonomous subjectivity, and then we deny them personhood in a sense that we should respect.

We don’t need scientific proof and scientific arguments, what we need is to learn to accept common sense as a basis for morality and moral judgment in Animal Rights issues as much as we accept our basic common sense to be enough when we talk about each other or internal human concerns.

 

the “personal choice” debate and homocentrism

As much as I like the cons of the article:

http://freefromharm.org/food-and-psychology/five-reasons-why-meat-eating-cannot-be-considered-a-personal-choice/

I find the “pros” partly a bit superficially treated.

Point 1. homocentrists and speciesist don’t care really wheather it’s “unnecessary” today to eat flesh. It’s about sacrificing life. Like “my human life is worth more than … “.

Point 2. Again, underlying mechanisms in society are overlooked when we hold back in as much that veganism (or rather not wanting to take part in animal murder in any form) is solely a choice of personal decision. The part of neseccisty on the side of “what human rights lose in a speciesist society” would need to be addressed for instance.

Point 3. It needs to be explained why a nonhuman animal victim isn’t even considered a victim by a speciesist or homocentrist respectively. “No being who prides himself on rationality can continue to support such behaviour.” Exactly that is the problem, they say that just because they are “rational” they are allowed to kill for their taste buds, etc.

Point 4. The destructivity of meat eating has the speciality that it does not care that it destroys the earth AND other humans (partly direclty) too … . To believe in the false cloak of a “humanity” that bases itself on speciesism and homocentrism, means to fall for a dangerous contractualism:

I don’t buy that people really in a basic sense accept even other humans rights. They don’t even accept my human right for example that I consider nonhuman animals to be rights holders as personalities too. So to believe that a person basically has a sense for “rights” but only applies it to her or his group seems wrong to me, BECAUSE this would be ONLY a contractualism, but with the claim for animal rights we are looking for the basic, fundamental rights to life, and earth-/ independent environmental rights, etc.

Point 5. here again it should be highlighted more or at all how animal rights and humans rights are intertwined – in a positive sense.

Otherwise I find it good and always highly due to discuss the issue of rights, in particular and foremostly animals rights and human “personal” choices!

Never rebut an enlightened anthropos – how dare you!

Why it is amazing how Animal Rights sets ITSELF on the right fundament. No question that it does exactly that, Animal Rights is a story, dynamic in itself.

However some birthhelpers who are perhaps a couple of eons too late are fighting for their new inventions of the wheel notwithstanding. Ok, what I’m talking about is the question of the futile fight of humans against their own perpetually continued ANTHROPOCENTRISM.

A lot of focus is currently set by the AR community on just that impotant question, which is good and a thing to do overdue because it helps you see reality clearer. Reality about the political implications of Animal Rights for Human Rights and Earth Rights mostly, I believe.

But what exactly is anthropocentrism?

Also … Why is a term chosen that strictly seems to omit the animal nature connection as the KEY point and only focuses on the human towards animal relation in a critical way though. What about that, what completely stands out of the reach of us the anthropos??? Ok, so we see the question at stake here is the perspective, we want to avoid looking at the world from a strictly homocentric viewpoint. But how far do we have to go with that.

I was recently criticised for criticising an AR advocate who is against anthropocentrism and who claims that Animal Rights find a reasonable argument in the similarities between beings – humans and nonhuman animals that is. This is an old string of argumentation when animal acvocacy issues are being discussed. But: do we want to land at comparative studies where we check one brain against the other to find out how much rights you should be entitled to be granted? Well, the amount of speciesism in the enlightened field of AR advocates is just plain tiresome. I just stop this rant at this point and ask you to continue it on your own behalf if you will.

Where do you draw the line, when asking others to act up – ethically?!

Where do you draw the line, when asking others to act up – ethically?!

chatty <3

I often wonder myself about what i can ask of others and what i can ask of myself, as when it comes to: what’s ethically ok, what can we do, and what is asked too much for most people (and even understandably asked too much?).

I don’t want to imply in any way with what I am saying here, that the “do whatever you want to” approach would be a recommendable path to seek in our daily practiced ethics.

What I mainly find worth highlighting in the context is this:

How about letting others down who really need my help and I could help them? Ok many of us would think I am talking about things relating to friends and family. but that’s not what I mean. What I mean is – extend your circle: helping “strangers”.

It shouldn’t be provocative to ask, my question is: is having ones “own” kids a form of letting “others” down by denying the “others” the support I could give them if I instead would chose to feel responsible just as much for them as I would for my own kids?

The other day I heard a fellow vegan talk about vegans who don’t care if exploitative “cheap” labor or any oppressive means were involved in the production process of vegan produce bought, that a vegan person’s care should ideally reach out to the questions of human rights inasmuch. This of course is an undeniably important critical point to bring up. Also this vegan person highlighted the need of a stronger awareness in the fields of veganism and environmentalism and how these two go together, and finally she briefly discussed the importance of making your kids aware of speciesism.

Thinking about vegan parenting made me think of the dilemma everybody of us faces when confronted with the decision: my life as how i would (possibly) want it for myself (having kids) or what about the kids that are born but who really don’t have much of a chance in the world for how we all are setting this world up anew every day.

I’ve taken the decision now. I don’t feel extravagant for having decided to put all my support into helping other’s kids,  nonhuman and human alike, primarily.