Why using the dead bodies of Nonhumans for art is not okay

If you consider yourself an anti-speciesist:

Using dead nonhuman animal bodies in art and for design, displays, etc. can never be consensual, because you don’t understand enough what a nonhuman individual might want or not want, to be able to definitely claim that he/she was okay with you using his/her body.

Don’t use nonhumans bodies in arts.

Why can’t you make vegan arts if you call yourself a vegan? Where should veganism unnecessarily end?

Check out alternatives, like the technique of artists like Keng Lye, for example, who creates realisitc 3-D arts.

What is Animality, and what it isn’t

You are at risk of engaging in rhetorical branding if:

… ANIMALITY equals:

pigeonholing nonhuman animal otherness in (philosophical, religious, scientific, biologistic, aesthetic, anthropologic) terms of excluding zoopolitical spaces of animal autonomy.

… and if HUMANITY amounts to:

“we”, the “Homo sapiens”.

A new discourse needs fresh approaches – not just a new labelling system for an ongoing current of stable fallacies.

 

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists

When speciesism feeds speciesism, and why AR activists should not fall for unproductive rhetorical twists.

From a recent discussion / Gruppe Messel

This Text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Two debates, the same problem with speciesist rhetorics blurring out a reasonable, coherent discourse.

A.)   The (unfortunately) highly controversial debate about Halal and Kosher slaughter methods.

B.)   The ‘humane meat’ marketing campaigns, using Animal Welfare as the as a vehicle for their sales boosting.

In both these speciesist segments – the one religious, the other one more plain-culturally based – you face an upholding of speciesist ideological tenets, additionally to the front-fight of defending a speciesist practice.

Why are we discussing these two examples of speciesist praxes?

Pro-arguments defending these two praxes, that are finding their basis in cultural reception, have permeated the AR debate to some extent on outreach strategies in regards to multiculturalism and culture – assuming “traditions” to be fixed societal phenomena/entities, immune to continuous ethical historical change.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of A.):

The basic argument from an AR side defending religious slaughter methods, as no less “cruel” than pre-stun methods, goes that Nonhumans suffer either way, conditions in slaughterhouses might even be worse, at least as bad, and that all slaughter must stop.

Usually missed in this string of argumentation is a more detailed critique why e.g. slaughterhouses such as those designed by Temple Grandin are for example “as bad” as religious slaughter methods: So called “humane” slaughter methods have to be criticized and critically examined in their own respect.

The argument against the relativization of ‘different speciesist practices’ as in the case A.) from an AR position can be:

Why are we fighting to be able to film abuse in factory farms, when in the end of the day the comparably more abusive form of “handling” does not make any difference at all? After all we are always trying to alleviate any comparably more “extreme” forms of suffering in a situation where we can’t stop speciesism overnight. We do that, alongside with campaigning for veganism!

The trap with religious animal killing practices is that the degree to which killing becomes a deed of “good” is mostly being overlooked let alone critically discussed. Can you really expect strict believers to end killing Nonhumans, if it’s on behalf of an “almighty God” who decrees you to do so?

From an AR point of view we would say that no religion/religious tradition/belief whatsoever must come before either Animal Rights or Human Rights, equally.

—-

The Problem of rhetorical twists permeating the AR discussion in the case of B.):

Anecdotal example: A German animal advocacy group advertises for “humane meat” with the slogan: “For a life before becoming meat” (http://www.provieh.de/downloads_provieh/01_ki_schweine.pdf, 5/11/14), the same slogan is being used by the Austrian Green Party (http://www.gruene.at/europa/2-welle,5/11/14).

The problem being that cultural tenets of speciesism are not questioned, nor what strategies are effective at what given context. Strategies and analyses seem to fall short to a short-term mass-movement idea and behaviour within the AR community.

– There is no clear line drawn towards the impacts of what comes along as cultural heritage.

– Activists fight against the symptoms, not the cultural roots of speciesist rethorics that enables speciesist practices to be culturally active.

On one hand “humane slaughter” advocacy has moved “down”, in terms of Animal Advocacy ideals, to some of the “stricter” Animal Welfare organizations, like the CIWF with for example their recent campaign “Better-Chicken.org”: it seems that such welfarist pro “humane meat” campaigns throw the baby out of with the bathwater, since instead of trying to seek alleviating suffering with the goal of ending speciesism overall as a target, they are of course prolonging speciesist culture.

However, AR advocates who do distance themselves from such campaigns, seem to fail to address (analytically and strategically) how important it is to target the functionality of speciesism and its rhetoric in the plain culturally-based sense.

– AR places its critique more at the sociological and the psychological level, not as much on the anthropological and cultural level, and when at least not with a distanced view.

– A question would be e.g.: How does the argument “I only buy organic humanely slaughtered meat” set in? Why is it accepted in society seen from a cultural / anthropological critical perspective?

This type of question has to be contextualized with how a culture works, and how the individual takes a role within this cultural setting for example.

 

Besitznahme durch Abwertung und Definition. Beraubung tierlicher Autonomie.

Wenn Nichtmenschen nicht autonom wären, und nur der Mensch es wäre, wann in der Evolution und womit hätte diese menschliche Autonomie dann angesetzt, und warum sollte tierliches Handeln und Denken nicht als vom Menschen und seiner Objektivitätswahrnehmung autonom anerkannt werden?

„Seinen eigenen Gesetzen folgend / early 17th cent.: from Greek autonomia, from autonomos ‘having its own laws,’ fromautos ‘self’ + nomos ‘law.’“ – Zoe Autonomos

Besitznahme durch Abwertung und Definition. Beraubung tierlicher Autonomie.

(Fragment)

Wir sprechen eher den Tieren ihre tierliche evolutionäre Autonomie ab, statt dass wir an totalitäre Strukturen in der Menschheit im Bezug auf Nichtmenschen und die natürliche Umwelt glauben. Unser Blick auf Nichtmenschen und die „Natur“ ist in einer Art verstellt, dass unsere Abwertungen vor uns selber akzeptabel erscheinen.

Der Missstand der Ungerechtigkeit ist, dass wir versuchen die tierliche Autonomie zu zerstören (physische Eingriffe und Maßnahmen) und mittels Speziesismus (geistig ideologisch) zu unterminieren.

„Besitz“ ist die Folge der Absprache tierlicher Autonomie.

„Tierverteidiger“ die für die physische Unversehrtheit von Nichtmenschen plädieren, den Nichtmenschen aber weiterhin ihre eigene tierliche Autonimie (vom Menschen und an und für sich) absprechen, betreiben eine unbewusste radikale Form des Anthropozentrismus und des Speziesismus.

Wir verbinden den Würdebegriff mit der Fähigkeit eines eigenen, unabhängigen Daseins (Autonomie).

Durch speziesistische Kunstgriffe bereiten wir den geistigen Boden in einer Gesellschaft vor, um den Besitzstatus eines Lebewesens zu legitimieren und als vertretbar erscheinen zu lassen.

Was ist unserem allgemeinen Verständnis nach Autonomie, siehe z.B. Wikipedia (für den vielleicht breitesten Allgemeinplatz) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autonomie?

Wenn Nichtmenschen etwas haben – „the wild and tamed beast“ – dann ist es Autonomie. Sie leben „von Natur aus“ in der Natur autonom – wenn wir sie nicht ihrer Freiheit berauben. Wir behaupten, Nichtmenschen seien Instinktbestimmt, und genau da setzt die Besitznahme durch arbitäre Abwertungsmechanismen ein: Wir machen uns Tiere nutzbar und „Untertan“, indem wir sie ihrer Existenzautonomie mit der Behauptung des Instinktverhaltens (kausaltiätsbestimmtes Verhalten) zu berauben versuchen.

Die Abhängigkeit von Lebensnotwendigkeiten als Instinktgeleitetheit zu interpretieren, ist eine Form der Minderbewertung der Angreifbarheit, der Verletzlichkeit und Bedingtkeit des Lebens – jedes Lebens. Jedes Lebewesen ist abhängig und bedingt, aber gleichzeitig auch autonom. Autonomie ist der zarte Keim der Verletzlichkeit tierlicher und menschliche Würde … .

Da ein Tier autonom handelt und denkt, ist es autotom. Der Vesuch der Eingrenzung tierlichen Denkens in anthopozentrisch definierte Parameter, ist eine Besitznahme durch die definitorische Interpretation tierlichen Denkens und Handelns.

Tierautonomie – tierliche Autonomie; ein paar eklektisch ausgewählte interessante Aspekte

Animal Autonomy:

In Veterenary Care:

Here I would simply suggest that “animal autonomy” is worthy of careful attention from philosophers and scientists and veterinarians. Animals are self-governing and make meaningful choices, in ways very similar to humans. As with our fellow humans, we should strive to understand and respect the preferences of other creatures. Research in ethology is continuing to explore how to understand animal preferences and how these preferences are expressed in observable behaviors. It is worth noting, too, that although the language of “autonomy” has not yet been strongly present in the veterinary literature, the concept has been important in the animal ethics literature more broadly. Tom Regan, for example, talked in his ground-breaking The Case for Animal Rights(1983) about animals as autonomous beings, with their own interests and desires. Regan even includes a very interesting discussion of what he calls “preference autonomy” and explores some of the ways in which autonomy in animals is different from autonomy in humans.

Animals and Autonomy. Can this vitally important ethical concept be meaningfully applied to animals? Jessica Pierce, Ph.D. in All Dogs Go to Heaven

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/all-dogs-go-heaven/201303/animals-and-autonomy

 

Animal Sanctitiy and Animal Sacrifice: How Post-Dawinian Fiction Treats Animal Victosm by Marian Scholtmeyer, Dissertation, 1989, pp. 57.

Animal Ethics:

Kantian ethics is normally not the place to look for an account of  direct moral obligations towards animals, as Kant claimed that we only owe animals indirect moral duties, out of respect towards the rest of  humanity. In chapter four, I consider modern reinterpretations of Kant’s arguments to provide support for the claim that animals should be  considered ends-in-themselves. I argue that despite the strength of these accounts, the concept of agency and selfhood that I support provides a better foundation for claiming animals as ends-in-themselves, and that respect for animal autonomy can be grounded on a Kantian argument for the respect of autonomy more broadly. I claim that in virtue of their agency and selfhood, animals should be considered ends-in-themselves, thereby including them in the moral community. My view is novel in that it includes agency, selfhood and autonomy as those features which make anyone, human or nonhuman, morally considerable.

Agency and Autonomy: A New Direction for Animal Ethics by Natalie Evans. Dissertation.

https://uwspace.uwaterloo.ca/bitstream/handle/10012/8158/evans_natalie.pdf?sequence=1

Animal Rights / Animal Liberation

How can I save an Animal today or stop these atrocities now? Even for just a few critters. Because that’s the context we so often miss. It’s about Animal autonomy, not about how the government turns on the people that care about the Animals. But while I’m on the subject, it’s nothing new!

Walter Bond, Green is the New Rage, http://supportwalter.org/SW/index.php/2011/06/24/green-is-the-new-rage/

Animal Caregiving

Kerulos Center Caring for the Caregiver  Project. The project’s overarching goal is to foster awareness and support for animal care organizations and caregiver wellbeing to help achieve the vision of a compassionate, ethical, trans-species society founded on mutual wellbeing.

http://kerulos.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Kerulos-Caring-for-Caregiver-Report-Final.pdf

Alle Links: 25. März 2014.

 

Feminism, Speciesism, Anthropocentrism – and the need to rethink the sexism / speciesism analogy

Feminism, Speciesism, Anthropocentrism

Examples of female rhetorics of speciesism: Objectification of beings oppressed, animalesque figures made with wool / felt; Lesbianism and dead nonhumans and trophys as cultural heritage; Helplessness and helping as an act of public viewing, link 1, link 2; the daily randnomness of the gender / nonhuman animal speciesist contexts, women taking/being part … (all links acc. 16. July 2013)

Is a self-critical view on gender / being a woman / feminism necessary? What would speak against it? We know that in our daily lives we, as women, make decisions that touch on core grounds that turn the private / the personal into the political. As vegans we know how impactful our personal choices are, and as social beings we also know how hard it can be to draw a line between the social expectations that one tries to fit in (in order to find a job, to be liked and accepted, keep ones family together, and so forth).

Speciesism, as remote as it seems, is to be found at the same point where “my-choice-to-decide-otherwise” (or not) crosses just any implications of socialization that I feel are ethically unjustifiable. When I rant against sexism I might as well rant against an injustice that targets nonhumans, if I am a vegan anti-speciesist minded person.

Speciesism can be understood to work socially as an ideology, where people who are convinced of their degrading stance believe in a collectively held fiction that is assumed and agreed upon as objectivity, so that no rebuttal can take place on “rational grounds”.

Women do feel at home in this construct inasmuch as men do, on the large scale. Both 50 percent of humanity, male and female, believe so much in human superiority that they are willing to constitute part of a speciesist society by fulfilling their individual part in the fiction.

“Gender” defines itself from interaction within a group or society. Being oppressed as a woman doesn’t automatically mean that you can’t be oppressive towards nonhuman animals. Drawing an analogy between sexism (or genderism) and speciesism does not take account of the different reasons and histories why the victim gets oppressed in the first place – for what ends, and how exactly.

If we turn a blind eye on the gender specific functions of speciesism and anthropocentrism we might risk a loophole in our argumentation for our own rights defending nonhumans and for integral Animal Rights themselves.

Speciesism is a unique tragedy. The history of being classified as “animals” by humans, with all that entailed, as beings whose existence had been on earth aeons before humans evolved, can’t be compared to any other form of oppression by simple analogy. Being objectified as solely “animate”, being slaughterable, edible, huntable, vivisectable, being objectifiable and judged as “definable” in the first place constitutes an incomparable situation for the affected subject, and hints at a unique technique of injustice on behalf of the oppressive side that is being applied to this victimized group.

Comparisons between different forms of oppression are extensively helpless efforts.

Either we plainly name that natural sciences, religion, philosophy mass society can’t legitimately classify the beings we call “nonhuman animals”, or we stay stuck in our psychological accompliceship with the very hierarchical and oppressive “systems” we criticize so vehemently as what regards our own pains.

I don’t see an alternative.

Image  © 2013 @farangisyegane

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

Palang LY

Veganic plus Animal Sanctuaries plus Ethics

There so far is no such thing as a “positive” veganic (which means: organic vegan agriculture) Animal Rights consciousness.

Not taking into consideration that nonhuman animals must be helped by all possible means, here looks to me like a form of speciesism might be lurking in the background, since if humans where in a comparable plight, anybody who would describe him-/herself as a non- misanthrope would help the humans in question.

What I am mainly interested in is:

Why doesn’t it occur to vegans and the veganic (vegan organic) movement, that humans and nonhuman animals can co-exist, can co-live without exploitation, as an option?

I have looked at various veganic projects, and as far as one can see, “animal rights” only plays a role in the way, that exploitation and usage of animals and animal products / fertilizer derived from animals is non-permitted, on ethical grounds, mainly. Hence, these people are VEGANS, and not just any people avoiding animal products: They avoid animal exploitation. That’s the Animal Rights part of the veganic movement.

But apart from that, the very nonhuman animals that we as VEGANS want to HELP, don’t come in or become visible or noticed as beings that we are willing to live together with, that we are willing to share the earth with. As if the soil and the forests were ours to use, ours to live on, ours to say what’s right to do with it (“it” … that is: nature).

Billions of animals

Of course the forceful exploitation of the reproductive system of animals has to stop. Of course any form of overpopulation is bad for anybody and this planet. But the lives, that didn’t chose to come into this world, the lives that just happen to find themselves here – we do have to ethically respect the fact that these individuals exist.

Sanctuaries and vegan farming should merge I believe! To cut a long “story” short and practical.

But back to veganic-ism as it is

There is the mention of using human manure and faeces for fertilization (apart from the much more promising sounding self-fertilizing gardening methods which exist in veganicism too of course). But if people are willing to use their own manure, as part of the biological process of vegan agriculture, can’t the idea of “the sanctuary” and the idea of a newly veganic option be created in peoples minds? People can tolerate their own manure somewhere, but not another (nonhuman) animal’s manure? I think we cannot say that it is speciesist and exploitative if both humans and nonhuman animals live together in a natural space without harming or exploiting or using each other.

We as vegans ought to LIVE together with the other animals on this planet, in a peaceful manner, in mixed communities. If we can’t develop a consciousness for that, we fail at creating a (more complete) positive ethic. It’s enormously tragic that we let the speciesist view of “animals, us and the world” win insofar, that this view manages to inspire us vegans not to willingly plan to live together with the so called farm animals in a vegan, caring manner, with a strong will to co-exist.

Are the only options we can chose from the one of degrading nonhuman animals or otherwise totally excluding them, and making them nonexistent in a (desired utopian) daily reality? No, really, because this planet is also an animals’ planet!

Ethics … To me the veganic movement makes itself look as if it creates and expresses a bifurcation in what veganism ideally should mean. As good at it looks now and as much as such farming practices are heading for the major part in a promising and important and ethically inevitable direction, the veganic code of ethics nevertheless ignores an important factor and that is, again, to include all animals in a life affirming way.

This fallacy in the veganic vegan understanding makes vegans overall look as if this movement was basically about clearing nonhuman animals in their positives – and as living facts and individual fates – simply out of our lives!

I think there is morally something going drastically wrong with us.

This text as a PDF (link opens in a new window)

Würden Sie wegen Ihres Veganismus auch auf Gott und Glauben verzichten?

Palang LY

„Macht Euch die Erde untertan“ 1. Mose (1)

Würden Sie wegen Ihres Veganismus auch auf Gott und Glauben verzichten?

Wenn wir Tiere nicht als Produkte, als Ware betrachten, als Besitz mit dem man machen kann was man will, wieso sind wir dann bereit hinzunehmen, dass Tiere auf dem Altar der Religionen oder traditioneller Bräuche geopfert werden? Wir schließen Zirkusse und Pelz aus, obgleich auch sie Bestandteile unserer spezisistischen „Kulturen“ sind. Aber wenn es um den Glauben geht, dann ist uns unser Gott wichtiger als das Recht, das wir nichtmenschlichen Tiere zuteil werden lassen müssten, um als Menschen wirklich gerecht/er zu werden.

Sollten wir nicht von vegan lebenden Menschen erwarten können, dass sie wissen, dass ein Tier nicht nur im Bezug auf Kommerz und Großindustrie verdinglicht und objektifiziert werden darf?

Manche sprechen vom Respekt gegenüber Tieren, der ausreiche um der Tierrechtsfrage gerecht zu werden. Und sie sagen es sei akzeptabel Tiere aus religiösen (sprich aus „geheiligten“) Gründen zu töten, wenn man dem Tier nur ausreichend Respekt gegenüber brächte. Und man soll das Tier, das zum Opfer wird, „human“ Töten. Das ist kein veganer Standpunkt, denn der Veganimus fordert, dass kein Tier zum menschlichen Nutzen eingesetzt werden darf. Die Religion kann hier keine Sonderregelung schaffen, denn es geht im Veganimus um Tiere und nicht um Gott.

Es geht um Lebewesen und das Leben. Wenn ich ein Tier meinen Zwecken unterwerfe, um es zu benutzen, zu verletzen und zu töten, dann lässt sich das nicht mit einer veganen Ethik auf sinnvolle Weise verbinden, auch wenn eine Religion solches von mir fordern möchte.

Manche sagen, das möge schon stimmen, aber so schnell könnten wir mit einem Umdenken bei religiös denkenden Menschen nicht rechnen, wenn überhaupt. Wir seien mit der veganen Bewegung ja überhaupt erst am Anfang und Religion und auf ihnen fußende traditionelle Bräuche könne man nicht von heute auf morgen abschaffen.

Solch eine Denkrichtung ist nicht ganz richtig. Denn auch wenn Gesellschaften – die im Westen oder die in der östlichen Hemisphäre gelegene Gesellschaften – bislang weit entfernt davon sind sich in Richtung eines Bewusstseins zu bewegen, dass Tiere auf ethische und affirmative Weise mit einbeschließen würde, nichtsdestotrotz richten sich unsere Vorstellungen über die vegane Lebensweise nicht nach dem „wie es in diesem Moment ist“ oder dem „wie es in der Vergangenheit war“, sondern nach dem „wie es sein sollte“!

Eine Utopie hat es bis hierher geschafft, und eine Utopie kann es, wenn sie nur konsequent durchgeführt wird, auch noch weiter schaffen.

So gravierende Lücken, wie die Inkaufnahme des Tieropfers in Religionen – d. h. rituelle und traditionelle Bräuche unangetastet zu lassen – bergen, außer dem Unrecht das sie aus Tierrechtssicht darstellen, die Gefahr der Verwässerung in sich für die, die meinen dass beides ging: konsequenter Veganismus und das Festhalten an einem Glauben, der das Gehorsam über die Vernunft setzt.

Der Sinn des Veganismus als das bislang effizienteste Mittel um der Tierausbeutung mit Widerstand zu begegnen, erscheint im Kontext von Religiosität fragwürdig, wenn die Religion den Menschen sowieso an die obeste Stelle der Schöpfung setzt. Eine Ergänzug im ethischen Codex wäre dann nowendig, kann in einem religiösen Denksystem aber nicht wirklich vollzogen werden, weil hier ja nur Gott und die von ihm auserkorenen solche gravierenden Entscheidungen über Sein und nicht sein und den Wert des Seins fällen dürfen.

Tiere sind keine Gegenstände, weder zum profanen Handel, noch im “erhabenen” Geiste – weder als Konsumgut, noch für einen Gott dessen menschliche Schöpfung.

(1) „Und Gott segnete sie und sprach zu ihnen: Seid fruchtbar und mehrt euch und füllt die Erde und macht sie euch untertan und herrscht über die Fische im Meer und über die Vögel unter dem Himmel und über alles Getier, das auf Erden kriecht.“
http://bibel-online.net/buch/luther_1912/1_mose/1/ (letzter Zugriff vom 19. Nov. 2012)

From individual to individual

Speciesism and homocentrism are the external manifestations of patterns in thinking that deny animal intelligence, and instead overvalue human intelligence. Humans are mostly behaving contractualist, unpredictable, unreliable, unfair, … and the list could go on in pretty negative terms. I wonder why that is the case, and I think it does not have to be that way.

I think it is possible for a human to be ‘animal intelligent’, to be non-contractualist, predictable, fair, tolerant, loving, … and that list could go on in positive terms. From my experiences with animals I learned about the possibility of ‘animal intelligence’:  The animals I have lived with truly were my best friends.

I think for a person who is truly nonspeciesistic in his/her thoughts and critical about homocentrism  it should be technically possible to really make the shift and start to become a better individual than what humans have per definition been so far, and even prided themselves with.

The time of human intelligence is over for me.

I am glad I defend animal rights from a standpoint of true ‘animal independence’ (of any human paradigm: biology, ethology, philosophy, religion … ).

***

Fragmentary thoughts:

The border around the castle ‘HUMAN’ is the one of scientifical categorizing. Within the castle we claim to be ‘complete’.

BIOLOGICAL HIERARCHISM ALWAYS PUTS HUMAN ‘OBJECTIVITY’ ON TOP OF WHAT IT DENIES THE OTHER SPEICIES: THAT IS ON TOP OF ANIMALS’ OBJECTIVITY

How can absolute objectivity be captured? With which parameters to measure against? Humans’ objectivity claim relies on subjective interests.

Ethical behaviour is one of the components taken out of the frame of an allround objectivity.

Animals get denied for their actions to be viewed as not insinctual.

Subsequently the VALUES of behaviour get ruled out from being within the ethcial scale of social actions between the species, etc.

A term such as ‘ethical’ desribes something that is existent, it’s not an idea in itself – otherwise it would not exist in the correlations…

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Die zerstörende Gewalt. Der Überlaufeffekt oder die Einmaligkeit in der Vorkommnis von Gewalt?

Zum Holokaust- und Genozidvergleich in der Tierrechtsdiskussion

Vorab: Braucht die Situation des Mensch-Tier-Verhältnisses einen Vergleich zu menschlich intraspezifischenen Situationen zur Hervorhebung von moralischer Relevanz? Wenn nicht, wozu dann die Genozidvergleiche in bezug auf die Situation des Verhältnisses menschlich-destruktiven Verhaltens gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren?

Das Hauptargument, das gegen Genozidvergleiche vorgebracht wird, liegt im Punkt der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen. Eine ausschließliche Zurückführung auf den Begriff der Würde, kann, als ethisches Kriterium, aber nicht zur Ableitung einer einseitigen moralischen Gewichtung angeführt werden, ohne dass dabei eine Abwertung der Problematik der Gewalthandlungen gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere vollzogen wird.

In der Unantastbarkeit der Würde des Menschen und dem Problem der Verbrechen gegen die Menschenwürde (gegen die Menschheit oder einen Menschen) liegt keine zwangsläufige ethische Implikation im Bezug auf das Verhältnis des Menschen zu seiner Außen- oder Umwelt, die zu einer allgemeinen Begründbarkeit von Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren führbar wäre oder diese Formen von Gewalt ausdrücklich und in jedem Fall sanktionieren würde.

Der Begriff der Würde kann, gesehen vom Standpunkt der Meinungsfreiheit, auch nicht strikt in seiner Gebundenheit reduziert werden, ohne dass man dabei das Recht auf freie Meinungsäußerung verletzen würde. Dass heißt, dass eine Auffassung eines Menschen über das Vorhandensein der Würde der nichtmenschlichen Tiere – solange er dadurch keinem Menschen schadet, oder Menschen oder einem Menschen dadurch Gewalt antut – in den Bereich seiner Gedankenfreiheit oder seiner freien Meinungsauffassung fällt.

Menschen werden auch als Opfer und auch als Täter als Würdewesen betrachtet, deren Würde man in den Fällen von Morden und Genoziden brechen wollte; zumindest wurde dies in der Menschheitsgeschichte immer wieder versucht.

Tieren wurde in der Menschheitsgeschichte von keiner Gesellschaft eine Würde einer Unantasbarkeit ihres Tierseins zuerteilt. Damit ist die Besonderheit der Tragweite ihrer Opferposition nicht problemlos mit derer menschlicher Opfer zu vergleichen.

In jeder Situation, in der ein Gewaltverübender ein Opfer schafft, wird man in der Auseinandersetzung mit dem Problem oder dem Fall, Parallelen zu anderen Gewaltsituationen ziehen. Bei Gewalt an sich, unabhängig von der dadurch betroffenen „Angriffsfläche“ oder dem geschaffenen Objekt von Gewalt, kann man vermuten, dass die Motivationen (Destruktivitätswillen, -bereitschaft, gewaltbereite Eigenbezogenheit, Aggression) im Täter übergreifend ähnlich strukturiert sein können, auch weil das letztendliche Ziel oder intendierte Ergebnis von Gewalt: der Mord, die Tötung, d.h. die Zerstörung eines Opfers ist.

Nun verhält es sich aber so, dass die Frage, warum ein Täter sich ein spezifisches Opfer oder eine spezifische Opfergruppe sucht, ganz unterschiedliche Gründe in sich birgt. Auch ist die konkrete Qualität oder Struktur von Gewalt ein maßgeblicher Faktor, der auf die zugundeliegenden Ursachen von Gewalt und die spezifische Gewaltpsychologie zurückschließen lässt.

Produziert gegalt gegen Tiere, Gewalt gegen Menschen? Wenn nicht, warum bestehen dennoch Zusammenhänge in der Gewaltpsychologie

Die Unterscheidungen im Täter-Opfer Verhältnis zwischen potenziellen Opfern, und die Überlappungsmöglichkeiten in der Gewaltbereitschaft ihnen gegenüber, läge in der Frage des sogenannten Spillover-Effekts (Überlaufeffekts):

Die Frage ist, wenn ich dem einen Opfer etwas antue, bin ich dann automatisch auch einem oder mehreren anderen potenziellen Opfern gewaltbereit gegenüber?

Und, dem gegeüberliegend: hat das eine Opfer von Gewalt automatisch dadurch, dass es zum Gewaltopfer wurde, etwas mit einem anderen Opfer einer Form gewaltbereiter Handlung grundlegend gemein, außer dass beide in einer Position des Opfers sind? Liegt irgend etwas auf der Seite des Opfers, das die Gewaltbereitschaft eines Täters auf sich zieht?

Robert Nozick hat die Frage des sogenannten Spillovers vor dem Vordergrund des Mensch-Tier Verhältnisses in der Form beschrieben:

‘[…] Manche sagen, dass Leute nicht so handeln sollten, da solche Handlungen sie brutalisieren und sie die Wahrscheinlichkeit bei der Person erhöhen, das Leben anderer Personen zu nehmen (wir können hinzufügen “oder andererweise zu verletzen”); allein aus der Freude daran. Diese Handlungen, die moralisch nicht an sich in Frage zu stellen sind, sagen sie, haben einen unerwünschten moralischen ‘spillover’ (Überlaufeffekt). (Dinge wären dann anders, wenn es keine Möglichkeit für solch einen ‘spillover’ geben würde – zum Beispiel für die Person, die von sich selber weiß, dass sie die letzte Person auf der Welt ist.) Aber warum sollte es da solch einen ‘spillover’ geben? Wenn es an sich völlig richtig ist, Tieren in irgendeiner Weise etwas anzutun, aus irgendeinem Grund, welchem auch immer, dann, vorausgesetzt eine Person realisiert die klare Linie zwischen Personen und Tieren, und behält dies in ihrem Kopf während sie handelt, warum sollte das Töten von Tieren dazu neigen, sie [die Person] zu brutalisieren und die Wahrscheinlichkeit erhöhen, dass sie [andere] Personen verletzen oder töten könnte? Begehen Metzger mehr Morde? (Als andere Personen die Messer in ihrer Nähe haben?) Wenn es mir Spaß macht einen Baseball fest mit einem Baseballschläger zu schlagen, erhöht dies in bedeutender Weise die Gefahr, dass ich dasselbe mit jemandens Kopf tun würde? Bin ich nicht imstande dazu, zu verstehen, dass sich Leute von Basebällen unterscheiden, und verhindert dieses Verständnis nicht den ‘spillover’? Warum sollten Dinge anders sein im Fall von Tieren. Um es klar zu sagen, es ist eine empirische Frage ob ein ‘spillover’ stattfindet oder nicht; aber es besteht ein Rätsel darüber, warum es das tun sollte.’ (1)

Diese Unterscheidung wird im Falle von nichtmenschlichen Tieren in auffallend deutlicher Weise vollzogen (Speziesismus). Ein Tier physisch zu schädigen oder zu zerstören, es zu töten, verhält sich im Rahmen unserer Gesetze als Sachbeschädigung, nicht als Körperverletzung oder Mord; während das Opfer-werden beim Menschen durch soziale, ethische, religiöse und gesetzliche Konstrukte eine andere Bewertung erhält.

Im Bezug auf Genozide kann man also sagen, die Menschen, die zum Opfer wurden, wurden vor diesem Hindergrund betrachtet, bewusst zum Opfer gemacht. Sie wurden bewusst aus dem ethischen und gesetzlichen Rahmen gewaltsam hinausbefördert.

Anders verhält sich die Situation der nichtmenschlichen Tiere in ihrer Rolle im Rahmen der spezisitischen und homozentrischen menschlichen Beurteilung. Wie schon gesagt gilt die Körperverletzung nichtmenschlicher Tiere nicht oder kaum als „Verletzung“, da die ethische Klassifizierung nichtmenschlicher Tiere, deren Leidenskapazitäten und damut auch deren Würde, bislang nicht mit im Rahmen der Verpflichtungen ethischen Sozialverhaltens ansiedelt. Wobei wir es hierbei tatsächlich mit einem neuen Komplex der Ethik zu tun hätten, dem Interspezies-Sozialverhalten. (2)

Die ganze anthropologische Konstellation einer homozentrisch ausgerichteten Welt, muss in ihrer Konkretheit untersucht und überdacht werden. Analogsetzungen reichen nicht, um hier zu einer ethisch-moralischen Lösung zu gelangen. Wegen der konkreten Beschaffenheit, aus der sich die diskriminatorische Haltung gegenüber der autonomen Bedeutung nichtmenschlicher Tiere zusammensetzt – aus dem Grund der ganz speziellen Form von Gewalt in diesem Fall – kann man keine ausreichende Analogie festmachen, um Ursachen besser verstehen zu können und diese Art der Manifetation von Gewalt (eben der gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere) zu bekämpfen. Damit bleibt aber auch der Genozid am Menschen ein vorwiegend gesondert zu behandelndes Phänomen.

Ausschließlich der Vergleich der Gewaltbereitschaft beim Menschen lässt Parallelen in den Täterpsychologien entdecken. Das hat mit dem jeweiligen Opfer aber nicht unmittelbar etwas zu tun. Warum „jemand“ zum Opfer wird, hängt mit schwer zu ergründenden psychologischen Ursachen auf Seiten des Täters zusammen. Wenn, als stereotypes Beispiel, ein betrunkener Mann einen anderen im Affekt wegen einer banalen Streitigkeit tötschlägt oder eine Frau Opfer einer Vergewaltigung wird, liegt in beiden Fällen zum einen der Aspekt der Gewaltbereitschaft des Täters vor, zum anderen aber wird ein Opfer aus völlig verschiedenen Motivationen heraus gewählt. Oder: als „Hexen“ im Mittelalter als solche klassifiziert und gefoltert wurden, lag eine andere Motivation zugrunde als bei Folterungen im islamischen Gewaltregime des Iran oder wiederum bei den Folterungen Oppositioneller in der Militätdiktatur Pinochets in Chile.

Der Umstand dessen, Opfer geworden zu sein, also des Verletztwordenseins des Opfers in seiner Würde als menschliches Individuum selbst, hat niemals Rechnung für die Tätermotivation zu tragen. Man kann die Gewaltmotivation nicht hauptsächlich über die Position oder Eigenschaften des Opfers ableiten, da das Opfer nur im indirekten Zusammenhang in ein Gewaltvergehen und in die Gewalt generell eingebunden wird. (Dabei sollte man nicht vergessen: es gibt keine ethische Grundsatzlegitimierung zur Gewalt, außer derer der Selbstverteidigung oder des Schutzes. Am deutlichsten ist die indirekte Einbindung eines Opfers in der Anwendung von Gewaltmitteln zur Erzielung politischer, ideologischer oder religiöser Macht.)

Ebenso würde man keinen direkten Vergleich zwischen der Strategie z.B. der Hexenprozesse zu der Struktur der Nazigewalt gegen ihre Opfer ziehen, weil die Komplexität der Formen von Gewaltbereitschaft in den spezifischen Fällen anders erklärt werden müssen.

Die Frage der Ursachen, der Psychologie des Täters und die Fragen der Gewaltstruktur sind maßgeblich für die Erklärung über die Motivation von Gewalt und ihrer Formation. Das einzige was eine generelle Schnittmenge darstellt, zwischen allen Formen der Gewalt, ist die Gewalt selbst.

Gewalt hat Ursachen und Folgen. Die Folgen müssen in einem differenzierten Verhältnis zu den Ursachen analysiert werden, da die Ursachen oft allein dem Täter (besonders auffallend im Fall von Persönlichkeitsstörungen (3)) oder einer Tätergruppe zugeordnet werden können, und die Folgen aber die konkrete (von Täter gewollte) Einbindung des Opfers in die Gewaltpsychologie des Täters anbelangen.

Das was nun die menschliche Gesellschaft nichtmenschlichen Tieren gewaltsam antut, braucht einen eigenen Begriff der dem Sachverhalt gerecht wird. Die Bezeichnung „Holocaust“ sollte als Bezeichnung klar umrissen bleiben: Das Wort an sich bezeichnete in religiösen oder rituellen Kontexten die überbleibende Asche oder vollständige Verbrennung eines Tieropfers! Das Wort hat heute die uns allen bekannte Bedeutung im Bezug auf den Menschenmord, vor allem an den Juden durch die Nationalsozialisten im Dritten Reich. Man hat bezüglich der Gefahr von Atomwaffen und den Abwurf der Atombombe auf Hiroshima auch von einem ‚nuclear holocaust’ gesprochen, und das Englische ‚holocaust’ wurde im angelsächsischen Sprachgebrauch häufig als Synonym für den Begriff Genozid – den Massenmord an Menschen durch Menschen – angewendet.
Es ist zweifelhaft ob es irgendeinen Sinn in der Sache der Tierrechte oder der Menschenrechte macht, eine Analogie durch den Begriff des „Holokaust“ aufzeigen zu wollen. Denn dieser Versuch der Gleichsetzung trägt weder zu einer weitergreifenden Erfassung der Problematik nichtmenschlicher Tiere in einer homozentrischen Welt bei, noch kann er wirklich die Ursache von Greueltaten die Menschen an Menschen begehen oder begangen haben klären.

Ich glaube, dass solange keine Übereinkunft in der Bezeichnung des Komplexes menschlicher Gewalt gegen nichtmenschliche Tiere besteht, man begrifflich weiterkommen könnte, indem man die Unbeschrieblichkeit und die Unfassbarkeit erstmal bestehen lässt. Man hat für das, was wir heute „Tiertötung“ und „Tiermord“ nennen, noch keinen ausreichenden Begriffsrahmen geschaffen und damit auch keinen eigenen umschreibenden Begriff zur Hand.

Abschließend: Es geht in diesem Text nicht darum, durch die Aufwertung oder vielleicht eher anders Bewertung der Tierproblematik, die Würde des Menschen in irgendeiner Weise in Frage stellen zu wollen. Sondern es geht darum, dass dem Problem der Gewalt gegenüber nichtmenschlichen Tieren in seinem eigenen Recht Aufmerksamkeit erteilt werden muss.

(1) Robert Nozick, Anarchy, State, and Utopia, New York: Basic Books, 1974, S. 36.
(2) Dieser Punkt würde so etwas wie ein Interspezies-Sozialverhalten anbelangen, das aber abgesehen von einigen wenigen Beispielen in der Tierrechtsliteratur bislang wenig Interesse gefunden hat.
(3) In Großbritannien führten Diskussion über die psychologische oder kriminelle Einstufung von ‚personality disorders’ vor forensischem Hintergrund zu dem Ergebnis, dass die Einstufung nicht-therapierbarer Persönlichkeitsstörungen für die Rechtsprechung ein nicht klar addressierbarer Problemfall bleibt.

Das Acrylbild oben stammt von Farangis Yegane http://crownofthecreation.farangis.de/birds.one. Dieser Text wurde von Gita Yegane Arani-May verfasst und ist im Veganswines Reader 08 erschienen.

Dieser Text als PDF (öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

Aus dem Vegan*Swines Reader IV (2012): Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Der Mythos der „humanen“ Art der Ausbeutung und Tötung von Tieren

Diese Informationen basiert auf Erfahrungswerten von Tierrettungs- bzw. schutzhöfen und den Recherchen bekannter Tierrechts- bzw. schutzorganisationen. Die Angaben beziehen sich auf die Realität in westeuropäischen und US-amerikanischen Agrarbetrieben.

Eine „humane“ Umgehensweise sollte eigentlich bedeuten, mit Respekt und Einfühlungsvermögen mit den Lebewesen umzugehen, die auf unsere Hilfe angewiesen sind. Es ist egal, ob es dabei um Menschen oder um Tiere geht. Das, was wir genau unter „humanen“, also menschlichen Werten verstehen, läßt darauf zurückschließen, auf welchem Level sich der gegenwärtige Aufgeklärtheitsstatus unserer Kultur befindet.

Würden wir die gleichen Methoden, die wir in der Aufzucht, Versorgung, und Tötung von Farmtieren praktizieren, auf unsere Haustiere anwenden, dann wäre das gesetzeswidrig und jeder normale Mensch würde so eine Behandlungsweise von Tieren als erschreckend und grausam empfinden … diesen Text als PDF lesen / downloaden (Link öffnet sich in einem neuen Fenster)

Vegan speciesism

Vegans and anti-speciesists who are acting as subconscious speciesists

I recently came across a campaign movie clip made by an Austrian vegan and anti-speciesist group called http://united-creatures.com/ . They said they wanted to show the live of two sibling pigs, one who lives more or less freely and more or less free from harm – as far as one could tell, and one who had to stay in the farm and he is eventually being killed there. The group United Creatures documents everything, for the purpose of making people aware and educating people about speciesism : http://united-creatures.com/thema/pig-vision/ .

They say they would not want to show gory pictures that would have a shock effect on the viewer. Still, It’s just what they are doing, and the entire project is set up so that you have some animal rights activists who are to a large extent passively, and one could say voyeuristically, only following a situation to document it for “educational purposes” … instead of buying the other animal out too.

A life becomes the subject of being a means to an end, for the purposes of informing the public about what goes on behind the walls of farms and slaughterhouses. Society already knows what goes on behind these walls. The community of animal advocates is resistant towards this fact and doesn’t seem to recognize how speciesism works.

Either that, or the AR community (with it’s big leading organizations who frame the dialectic) wants to keep imagining that we are all still living back in the 80ies where it only started yet that documentations about slaughterhouses were made more widely public.  Nonetheless even at that time speciesism had it’s own ways of communicating its defamatory language about how to best degrade nonhuman animals in our homocentric societies.

As for today, just look at the contemporary arts scene for instance … People like those from the group ‘United Creatures’ must be aware of “artists” such as the famous Austrian speciesist Herman Nitsch who makes orgies in which a selected group of people takes part in the dismemberment and slaughter process of a nonhuman animal.

Animal activists such as the group ‘United Creatures’ must have met conscious speciesism also in the mindset of hunters, butcher shops, barbecue freaks, leather fetishists, snuff videos, speciesist “jokes”, anti ar+vegan comments on the internet … and what have you. Still, activists pretend nobody knows about the atrocities that are being done to animals, so we should keep showing how animals are being murdered – for the purpose of printing yet another pamphlet.

A nonhuman animal is not a means to an end. Animal rights activist should sense that there is a threshold, and it’s bad enough that theiy themselves keep crossing a line that they should be aware of: the line of objectification that has long been wiped out by our speciesist societies.

Instead of showing over and over again how animals are being degraded and murdered, for educational or documentary purposes, animal activists should make the mechanisms of speciesism more aware I believe, and what speciesism exactly is, how is psychologically and ideologically works.

 

Arts and homocentrism: Pesi Girsch’s “Nature Morte”

PESI GIRSCH’S “NATURE MORTE”

Pesi Girsch aestheticises the corpses of dead animals on some of her photography.

http://members.tripod.com/pesi_girsch/stillalife.htm (accessed 23rd April 08 )

On her bio she portrays herself with a baby kitten nevertheless: http://members.tripod.com/pesi_girsch/bio.htm (accessed 23rd April 08 ), so one can assume that she sees some qualitative difference between being amongst the living or being amongst the (I assume) somehow made-to-be-dead. I guess I rightly assume that the ducks and the weasel type of animal on the dead animal photos of hers, did not die from natural causes.

One could say that it gives the dead animal a dignity to be draped into becoming a display for a photo taken by a human for them animals to look aesthetical while dead. But I wouldn’t agree with that. I see a type of typical encryption here, which turns art into a tool for viewing the real with the specific attempt to find an objective standpoint, instead of arts as a way to only relate to the real in a subjective way, which would put an emphasis on a more free and autonomous thinking.

Why does the arranged corpse of an individual animal has to become an object of a photo?

Why are the dead animals displayed in a sterile, soft and clean – a seemingly peaceful or mute – context on Peri Girsch’s photos, when the real death of the animals had – and this is my assumption – been taking place in a wholly different context that preceded this type of setting.

What matters to me is the perspective of the animals, and I automatically imagine that they didn’t want to die through the hands of humans (the photos leave it factually unclarified how the animals came to death). The set up encryption subtly suggests that I need not care about these individual animals as a viewer. That they only matter now that they have been given a meaning in an anthropocentric context.

Both is depressing: the imagination of the death and seeing the animals displayed in this way of peaceful, aestheticized “bizarreness” on the photos. Worst of all is to imagine that the lives, i.e. the form of existence of beings other than humans, doesn’t matter as lives to the photographer. Pesi Girsch arranges the condition of being dead in these animals in a way that is demeaning to their selfness and to their otherness from us.

More that I wrote about speciesism and art can be found at these locations : http://www.farangis.de/blog/category/animalistic-issue , http://www.simorgh.de/objects/tag/arts-and-speciesism/